The Chequered Wallers

A history of the Warren als Waller Family

by Antonia Waller

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Preface

This short book records the descent of one branch of the Waller family and in
part, documents many years of genealogical research. It is hoped that it will be of interest
to both family members and genealogists, and so contains references and explanations
that may be obscure to some readers and superfluous to others. Please accept my
apologies for these and any other deficiencies.

Many people and establishments have assisted with this research and I would like
to thank them for their help and advice.

The Ashwell Museum (field studies section)
The British Library
Cambridge County Record Office
Cambridge Folk Museum
Cambridge University Library
Essex County Record Office
Hertfordshire County Record Office
The London Guildhall Library
Luton Public Library
Poplar Library (Family History Dept.)
The Public Record Office (Kew and London)
St. John's College Cambridge Library
The Society of Genealogists' Library
Anthony Waller of Camberley
Brigadier Hardress Waller of Nenagh, Co. Tipperary, Eire
The College of Arms, London (Dr. Conrad Swan, York Herald of Arms and senior
genealogist, Mr. T. Woodard).

In the course of my investigations I have referred to a great number of books and
other records. Many of these are recorded in the footnotes. Those readers who would
like to learn more of the history of the early Warrens should refer to "A History and
Genealogy of the Warren Family", by Rev. Thomas Warren, recently reprinted in
facsimile by Gresham Books.

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Throughout this history I have applied the system devised by the Surname Archive
of the Society of Genealogists of allotting identifying letters to each 30 year span of time.
Those individuals marked thus (X), as in Sir Laurence Warren,(A) are in the direct line that I
have traced. It is hoped that this convention will assist in differentiating between the many
like-named individuals mentioned. The table of these identifying letters is given below.

prefix dates prefix dates prefix dates
-O 1020-1049 A 1380-1409 N 1770-1799
-P 1050-1079 B 1410-1439 O 1800-1829
-Q 1080-1109 C 1440-1469 P 1830-1859
-R 1110-1139 D 1470-1499 Q 1860-1889
-S 1140-1169 E 1500-1529 R 1890-1910
-T 1170-1199 F 1530-1559 S 1920-1949
-U 1200-1229 G 1560-1589 T 1950-1979
-V 1230-1259 H 1590-1619 U 1980-2009
-W 1260-1289 I 1620-1649 V 2010-2039
-X 1290-1319 J 1650-1679 W 2040-2069
-Y 1320-1349 K 1680-1709 X 2070-2099
-Z 1350-1379 L 1710-1739 Y 2100-2129
M 1740-1769 Z 2130-2159

This book could not have been published without the active support of my late
husband, Joseph John Waller. Thanks are due also to the many other family members
who have generously shared their memories and documents.

Antonia Waller
Aveley, Essex, England,
July 1991

© 2002 The Waller Family Trust

All rights reserved. Parts or the entirety of this publication may be reproduced only after acknowledging
source of the copy or extract.

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Table of contents

Preface
Prefix dates Table
Introduction
The Normans
The Anglo-Normans
The Warrens of Poynton
Henry Tudor and the Warren als Wallers
The Warrens called Waller
The Wallers of Ashwell and St. Albans
The London Wallers
Transcripts of Wills Appendix A

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Introduction

During the sixteenth century some members of the Warren family descended
from the Warrens of Poynton started using Waller as their surname. Why this name
change took place is uncertain, but the facts are indisputable: In 1572, Robert Cooke, then
the Norroy King of Arms at the College of Arms in London,1 granted arms to William
Warren alias Waller (F) of Bassingbourn Co. Cambs. and Ashwell Co. Herts., descended
from a younger house of Warren of Poynton 2 and thus a descendant of William, the
Count de Warenne,(-O) and his wife Gundrada, the fifth daughter of William the
Conqueror. Later generations of William's (F) family have been happy to continue calling
themselves Waller, usually without referring to the original Warren roots.

Members of the Warren of Poynton family are recorded in the Heralds' Visitation
of Hertfordshire 1634 for the Colney and Harpenden branches as Warren and for the
Ashwell branch as Warren alias Waller.3 Thus the de Warenne arms of the Chequers and
the Mowbray Lion, with differences, is confirmed for the Wallers who descend from the
Warrens of Poynton.

The Warren als Wallers have never hyphenated the names but when "Warren" or
"de Warenne" has been used, it has been as a Christian name. The Wallers of County
Tipperary, who descend from the fifth son of Edward Warren als. Waller of Ashwell and
his second wife, Margaret Glascock, have used "de Warenne" quite frequently as a final
Christian name.

A second Waller family, and the one most often represented on commercially
available "coat of arms" wall plaques, is the Waller family of Kent. Certainly, they are the
most popularly known Wallers. There has been no name change in this family apart from
the dropping of the prefix 'de' in late medieval times. Their arms are; three walnut leaves
Or on a bend Argent engrailed on a shield Sable, with the motto "Haec Fructus Virtutis".

They descend from an ancient family of Kent. It is said that an illustrious
ancestor, Richard Waller, fought and was knighted at Agincourt and received the honour
of an addition to his escutcheon from Henry V. The full pedigree of this family is
recorded on a wall plaque in Lamberhurst Parish Church, Kent. The family is said to
originate in Newark-on-Trent and descends from Alured de Waller (1183). Other notable
members of this family are Sir Thomas Waller of Dover Castle, his son William (the
Roundhead General, Sir William Waller) and their cousins, the poet Edmund Waller, also
Sir Hardress Waller, one of the signatories of Charles I's death warrant.

There is said to be a marriage between the Warren als Waller family of Ashwell
and the Kent Wallers; between General Sir William Waller's daughter Dorothy and one
of the sons of Edward Waller of Ashwell. This marriage of Dorothy Waller of Kent has
never been established conclusively by either family. One must therefore assent that there
is no early connection between the Wallers of Ashwell and the Kent Wallers. Indeed their
completely separate arms bear witness to the lack of blood kinship between the two
families.

1 second in charge at the College of Arms, otherwise called "Clarencieux"
2 namely Chequy Or and Azure, within a bordure engrailed Sable on a canton Gules a lion rampant
Argent double-queued of the third.
British Library Ref: 8651489 date 1572, Harley Ms Ref 1546 folio 114, justified by Robert Cook,
Norroy King of Arms. The arms were granted without a cadency difference, which augmentation does not
appear before the College of Heralds' confirmation of these arms to Edward Warren als Waller in 1634,
with a Fleur de Lis.
3 Harley Ms Ref 1504 143b showing William's (F) sons Henry and Edward with descendents

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There are several families who are surnamed either Warren or Waller, who have
no blood ties with either of the Hertfordshire or Kent families. Their surnames probably
derive from trade names or occupations. The Warren surname can be connected with the
trade of Rabbit Warreners, who cared for and preserved the animals that were so valuable
for both meat and fur in medieval times. The Waller surname may come from those who
practiced the skilled trade of Dry Stone Wall Builders, found especially in northern
counties of England among farming communities. Waller is also a name found in
Scandinavia and could come from fairly late immigrants from that part of the world.

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The Normans

According to tradition the de Warennes were the offspring of those Vikings who
came to northern France in about 900 AD as part of a war band lead by Rolf the Ganger,
known in France as Rollo the Dane. They made themselves so unpleasantly feared that
the King of France was thankful enough to buy them off with a grant of land in the
neighbourhood of Caux.1

With the passage of the next hundred years the Vikings, now called "Norse"
or "Normans" became Christianized, adopting the trappings of civility, including the
French language. Like many other converts, they became more devout than their teachers.
This showed in after years by the number of monastic foundations they sponsored and
the churches they built. At the same time they learnt to build the sort of fortification for
which they became famous. When Edward the Confessor of England built his Abbey at
Westminster his workforce included Norman architects and masons.

Before the great invasion of 1066 the Normans had settled down in France and
doubtless felt no less native than do the descendants of the immigrant Australians in
Melbourne and Sydney at the present time. One such immigrant family in Normandy
produced a son, Herfastus, and five daughters, Gunnora, Wevia, Werina, Duvelina and
Sainfria, said children of William Longsword, one of the sons of Rollo the Dane.

Following Norse custom, the original Danish invasion of French territory must
have been very much a family affair with the Long Ships manned village by village,
endowed by the fathers and crewed by all the younger sons, cousins and uncles. The
much earlier Greek voyagers of the Argonauts followed the same pattern.2 The Vikings,
as we know, had the Argonauts' habits of plundering where they could and trading where
they must and at least, there was intermarriage: The legend of the enterprising alien
youngster who won for himself and his family, the king's daughter and "half my
kingdom" is exemplified in few families better than through Herfastus and his sisters.

One of Herfastus' daughters married Walter de Santo Martin and gave birth to
William de Warenne,(-N) the ancestor of the de Warenne family, and of the Mortimers.
Herfastus' sister, Gunnora, married Richard, Duke of Normandy and had two sons,
Richard and Robert. As Richard died without an heir, he was succeeded as Duke of
Normandy by his brother, Robert, called "the Magnificent". William the Conqueror was
Robert's illegitimate son by Arlette, his concubine. Despite his illegitimacy he was
accepted as the rightful heir by France.

When considering the later Anglo-Norman families, it should be realised that,
according to feudal law, all conquests made by a subject of the King, belonged to the
King. Thus, the whole history of medieval France and England is the story of the efforts
of France to claim sovereignty over England and England's fierce resistance to this claim.
Be that as it may, no King of England, until the Hanoverians, ruled in England without the
permission of France, sometimes tacit and sometimes overt. To cite an obvious example,
it was French money, arms and influence that overthrew Richard III, the last Plantagenet
monarch of England. Richard III refused French bribes and must have been a thorn in
their sides. Henry VII, on the contrary, besides being of French Royal descent 3 was

1 Rollo agreed to do homage for the territory and, perhaps because of an impish sense of humour, he
acknowledged his liege lord by raising the King's foot to his lips, rather than by bending his head in
submission.
2 the piratical Greeks of the Battle-axe peoples spread into Scandanavian parts, according to Prof.
Geoffrey Bibby.
3 through Katherine, the widow of Henry V

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brought up under the aegis of the French Court. Incidentally, Henry VII was most
unlikely to refuse a bribe from anyone.

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The Anglo-Normans

William, Count de Warenne,(-O) the grandson of Walter de Santo Martin and
ancestor of the Warren Wallers, came to England with William, The Duke of Normandy
in 1066. His brother, Ralph de Mortimer, was also of that company. William, Count De
Warrene (-O) married Gundrada, the 5th daughter of William the Conqueror and certainly
appears to have enjoyed his full confidence, both as a son-in-law and as a military
commander. He was also appointed as one of the chief Justiciars. William's (-O) Norman
title "Count de Warenne" became the surname of the family in England when his son
William de Warenne (-P) was given the English title of Earl of Surrey by King William
Rufus.

When the dust of Hastings settled, William (-O) had accumulated a vast holding of
lands in England; in Shropshire, Essex, Suffolk, Oxford, Hampshire, Cambridgeshire,
Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire, Norfolk, Lincoln, Sussex and Yorkshire. In all, he held
about three hundred lordships. He had castles of residence at Lewes in Sussex, at Castle
Acre, Norfolk and at Coningsburg in Yorkshire.

William de Warenne (-O) and his wife Gundrada were very devout. While on a
journey to Rome, their travels were interrupted by the wars between the Pope and the
Emperor. They broke their journey in Burgundy, where they were hospitably entertained
by the monks of the abbey of Clunie. Greatly impressed by the piety of the community
and in gratitude, the de Warennes resolved to establish Cluniac monks in England.
Accordingly, they subsequently founded Lewes Priory. This eventually became a large
and important establishment with several subordinant foundations, notably at Castle Acre,
where the impressive ruins of the Abbey can be seen to this day. It is said that Lewes
Priory, dedicated to St. Pancrace, had upwards of one hundred monks.

Gundrada died in childbed at Castle Acre, on 27 May 1085. Her husband,
William,(-O) died on 24 June 1088. Their children were William (-P) the heir, Reginald,
Gundrada, Edith, and another daughter, married to Ernestus Colunchis.

When he died in 1087 William the Conqueror bequeathed the dukedom of
Normandy to his eldest son, Robert, as was his due. To his second son, William Rufus,
he bequeathed his conquered lands of England, while to his third son, Henry, he left only
money, five hundred silver pounds.

Many of the barons, including William de Warenne,(-P) felt that Robert should have
been left both England and Normandy, and so supporting Robert against William Rufus,
went into exile in Normandy. This state of affairs did not last long however, and William
later accepted William Rufus as King of England. Rufus made William de Warenne (-P)
the Earl of Surrey.

After the sudden death of William Rufus, his younger brother Henry seized the
throne as King of England. William de Warenne,(-P) joined by his brother Reginald,
together with his Mortimer cousin Robert de Belesme, and other Norman barons again
supported Robert of Normandy. However, Robert was not an able ruler and eventually he
preferred to go on Crusade instead of furthering his fortunes in Normandy and England
against Henry's ambition.

Defeated by Henry at Tinchebrai in 1106, William (-P) forfeited his English
earldom of Surrey, but he later acknowledged Henry and swore allegiance to him. His
estates restored, he became Henry's faithful supporter to the end of his life. He married
Isabel, the daughter of Hugh the Great, Earl of Vermandois. William (-P) died on 11 May
1138 and was buried at Lewes Priory. His wife Isabel had died seven years before him,
on 13 February 1131. They left several children: William, his heir, Reginald de
Warenne (-R) and Ralph de Warenne, and daughters Gundrada and Ada. Ralph died

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without issue. Gundrada was much married, to Roger, Earl of Warwick, to William of
Lancaster, (by both of them she had children) and finally, to Roger de Glan. Ada married
Henry, Earl of Huntingdon, the son of King David of Scotland and she had, among other
offspring, William and Malcolm (both kings of Scotland).

William de Warenne (III), Earl of Surrey, the heir, married Adela, the daughter of
William Talvace, son of Robert Belesame, Earl of Shrewsbury. Adela was therefore, a
distant cousin. They had only one child, Isabel, who was the de Warenne heiress.
William de Warenne (III) joined the Crusades with King Louis of France and is said to
have been killed in a battle near Laodicea on 14 January 1148. He was the last of the
elder branch of the direct de Warenne line. His daughter Isabel was married firstly to the
son of King Stephen of England, William de Blois,1 who adopted his wife's name and
titles. He was nicknamed "Le Gros" and he died in 1160, leaving no lawful issue. His
widow was married, without much delay, to Hameline Plantagenet, illegitimate son of
Geoffrey Plantagenet, Earl of Anjou, the father of King Henry II, and so Isabel became
sister in law to the King. Isabel died on 13 July 1199. Isabel and Hameline Plantagenet
left a son, William, who was known as William de Warenne.2

To recapitulate: The fourth Earl of Warren and Surrey (de Blois) was not, by
blood, a de Warenne at all. The de Warenne descent was carried by his wife, Isabel, but
as the two had no children, the title Earl of Surrey was a legal courtesy. Isabel's second
husband, Hameline Plantagenet, also assumed the name and title of de Warenne, Earl of
Surrey. Their son, William de Warenne (VI), Earl of Warren and Surrey carried on both
line and title through his mother Isabel de Warenne. He married, first, Maud de Albini
and secondly, Maud the daughter of the Earl of Pembroke, William Marshall. They had a
son, John, entitled the seventh Earl.

William de Warenne (VI), who died in 1240, was the first Earl of Surrey carrying
Plantagenet blood. For a while he wavered in allegiance to King John and flirted with the
barons in their revolt. After John's death, he swore allegiance and remained faithful to
Henry III. He had two children by his second wife, Maud;3 John, his heir and a
daughter, Isabel who married Hugh de Albini, Earl of Arundel. William de Warenne (VI)
also had two illegitimate children; Griffin Warren and a daughter, who was concubine to
King John, by whom she had a son, Richard Warren.

Much has been made of the ungovernable tempers of the Plantagenets. This can
be seen particularly in the acts of John de Warenne, the seventh Earl of Surrey. He killed
Alan, Lord Zouche at Westminster in a bloody afray, fled to Reigate and refused to submit
to the King's Justice. He was fined ten thousand marks. However, in the third year of
King Edward I's reign he made his peace with the King and one thousand marks of his
fine were remitted. As well as having a temper, he must have been a very theatrical type.
When Edward I issued his writ "Quo Warranto" inquiring into the title by which lands
were held, he, conveniently forgetting his Plantagenet blood, flung down an old and rusty
sword before the Commissioners, and declared to them that his ancestors, coming to
England with William the Conqueror, had won his lands by the sword for, he said,
William had not conquered England alone, but with the assistance of his followers. He
concluded "The sword is my warrant; Gladio vici, gladio tenes, gladio tenebo." Perhaps, in
view of his antecedents, it should have been "by the distaff", but the same could be said of
several other families in the English nobility, both before and after this time.

This seventh Earl was only five years old at his father's death and he was placed
under the guardianship of Peter de Savoy, the Queen's brother. In 1247 he was married to
Alice, the daughter of Hugh le Brun, Earl of March. There can have been little time when
he was without a sword in his hand: He supported Henry III against the barons and joined
him at Guienne in 1254. Returning to England he fought in the King's army against

1 see Prof. R.H.C. Davis' "King Stephen"
2 He adopted "de Warrena" the latinised surname of his mother
3 besides being the daughter of William Marshall she was the widow of Hugh Bigod, Earl of Norfolk

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Llewellyn of Wales. He was then given charge of Pevensey Castle. He defended
Rochester Castle for the King, but was defeated near Lewes and fled to France. In 1265
he returned and was joined by Prince Edward, the King's son (later Edward I). The barons
were defeated at the battle of Evesham and de Warenne was restored to his lands in
England. Then followed the afray at Westminster and de Warenne was again in disgrace.
Pardoned, he continued to fight in all King Edward's wars. He died in Kennington, on 27
September 1304, leaving two children by his second wife, Joan, the daughter of William
Mowbray.

John de Warenne (VII) had a son, William, by his first marriage. William was
killed at Croydon during a tournament on 15 December 1286. William had married Joan,
the daughter of Robert de Vere, Earl of Oxford, by whom he had a son, John, born
posthumously. This John inherited from John de Warenne (VII), his grandfather. There
was also a sister, Alice, who married the Earl of Arundel.

The last Earl of Warren and Surrey was the aforementioned John de Warenne,
grandson of the seventh Earl. He had been brought up by this grandfather and so had
strongly developed military bent. When Edward I married him to his granddaughter
Joan 1 there could hardly be a greater mesalliance. The two were quite incompatible and
parted after only three years; John de Warenne to go gratefully off to the wars in
Scotland. Edward I died shortly after and was succeeded by his son, Edward II. De
Warenne accompanied the King to France for his espousals and, when war was resumed
with Scotland, returned to do battle once more.

I have mentioned that his marriage to Joan nee de Barr was a disaster. However,
they did have a son, Edward, who predeceased him. Unfortunately this child did nothing
for his marriage. Instead, John lived with a noblewoman, Maud de Nereford, by whom,
over the years, he had six children, three of them males, who used the surname of de
Warren. There are two petitions made by Edward the King on behalf of these illegitimate
children, to the Pope:

"The King to the Venerable in Christ: whereas our cousin John, Earl of
Warenne, had two natural sons, our cousins Masters John and William de
Warenne, begotten by him on a noblewoman, not married, the King asks for
support of his application to the Pope on their behalf."
And again:

"Edward to the Most Holy in Christ, lauds John, Earl of Warren, whose
lawful son and heir is dead, and asks benefices for the two illegitimate sons."

However, since two of these illegitimate sons were ecclesiastics, they were celibate.
It is highly unlikely that they would have permitted any of their illegitimate children (if
any) to use the de Warenne name. Therefore, they would not have given rise to the
Warrens of Poynton, with whom we are concerned. About the third son, Thomas, nothing
is known. Watson 2 assumes that he predeceased his father, since all the other children
were cared for in John's will of 1304.3

De Warenne, the eighth Earl, had troubles on a larger canvas: He had been
steadfast in his loyalty and allegiance to Edward II, but had sided with those who worked
to banish Piers Gaveston, the King's homosexual partner. However, when Edward
reinstated Gaveston, de Warenne felt forced to abandon the King. An additional
complication was that his cousin, Roger Mortimer, who headed the anti-Gaveston group,
was also the Queen's lover. De Warenne, with Henry of Pembroke, Robert Clifford and
others, laid siege to the castle of Scarborough, where Gaveston had retreated. The
favourite surrendered and was taken to Warwick Castle, where he was beheaded. De

1 the third daughter of the Earl of Barr
2 Watson's History of the Earls of Warren and Surrey
3 See Dugdale, from Glover attested by William Flower, then Norroy King of Arms.

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Warenne does not seem to be involved in the later, and most gruesome murder of the
King.

The Earl died without legitimate issue and his estates largely went to his sister
Alice Fitz-Alan, the wife of the Earl of Arundel despite the fact that there were surviving
children of the marriage of the seventh Earl of Surrey to Joan de Mowbray. The eldest
son of that marriage, John, died without issue. Of the second son, Robert, records are
silent but the third son, Edward, married in Ireland. His title to the earldom was never
claimed.

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The Warrens of Poynton

Any person, historian, archivist, genealogical investigator or mere amateur, writing
about events said to have taken place an approximate five hundred years before, is in an
invidious position. There are bound to be some very conflicting accounts of such events,
coloured by the social and the political stance of the narrators. Since my aim is to suggest
possible reasons for the migration of the Hertfordshire Warrens, sometime called Waller,
and as a corollary, the name change noted by the College of Heralds in 1572, I propose to
examine, as far as reading takes me, the background of this family, the senior group
known as the Warrens of Poynton, Cheshire, one-time Barons Stockport and Lords of
Poynton, and further, the Hertfordshire descendants of this family.

According to Ormerod, Sir Edward de Warren who married Cecily daughter of Sir
Nicholas de Eaton of Stockport was the illegitimate son of John, the eighth Earl Warenne.
It is also suggested that John de Warren was the legitimate son of John the seventh Earl
Warenne. Alternatively, according to the pedigree of Flower and Glover (1580), Sir
Edward was the son of John, the son of Sir John, the son of William, which William was
unquestionably the son of Reginald de Warenne, a younger brother of William, the third
Earl Warenne.

As can be seen, the authorities differ as to the exact mode of the descent from the
Earls of Warenne and it is very unlikely to be proven so long after the event - there would
be no changing history anyway. The de Warenne estates devolved upon the Howard
family, via Arundel, the Earl of Surrey, the courtesy title of the eldest son of the Duke of
Norfolk, who married the sister of the eighth Earl Warenne.

Returning to the cadet line of the Earls of Warenne in the person of Reginald de
Warren,(-R) he was the second son of William,(-P) the second Earl. As William (-O) the first
Earl, also had a younger son Reginald, over the years the identities of these individuals
have become confused. It was Reginald de Warren, son of the first Earl, who married
Alice, the daughter of William de Wormgay in Norfolk. His nephew, Reginald de
Warren,(-R) was married to Aldelia, a daughter of Roger de Mowbray, and is the actual
ancestor of the Warrens of Poynton. This can be seen by their coat armour: The lion of
Mowbray was superimposed on the de Warenne chequers at this time, about 1143.

Reginald (-R) was made keeper of the castles of Bellencombre and Mortimer.
Before William de Blois died in 1160, he appointed him keeper of Norwich. He was also
one of the Justices Errant between 1168 and 1171. He was a baron of the Exchequer
about 1171 and in 1177 was the Sheriff of Surrey. In 1171 he was Sheriff of Kent and
Sussex. If this had been Reginald, son of the first Earl, he would have survived his father
by eighty-eight years and his mother by ninety-one years, which is impossible.
Obviously Reginald de Warren,(-R) who married Aldelia de Mowbray, was the father of the
Warrens of Poynton.

Reginald,(-R) had a son, William,(-R) who was also the keeper of Norwich Castle.
His name occurs in several charters, one of these in 1186/1189. He married Isabel de
Haydon, daughter of Sir William de Haydon of Norfolk. Their son, Sir John de Warren,(S)
married Alice de Townsend, the daughter of Roger de Townsend, also of Norfolk. The
son of this marriage, John de Warren,(-T) married Joan, the daughter of Sir Hugh de Port of
Etwell, in Derbyshire, by whom he had a son, Edward de Warren.(-V)

Sir Edward (-V) married Maud,1 the daughter of Richard de Skegeton. Their
children were; Ralph, Sir William, Sir Edward (-X) and John. Ralph and John died without

1 Maud inherited the manors of Boton and Skegeton.

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issue, as did Sir William, who was with Edward III at the siege of Calais in 1347 and bore
the arms; chequy Or et Azure, on a canton Gules a lion rampant Argent.

Sir Edward (-X) seems to have been of age by 1331, the fourth year of Edward III's
reign. He married Cecily, the daughter and heiress of Sir Nicholas de Eaton, who had
inherited through his wife, Joan of Stockport.1 Sir Edward Warren (-X) was living in 1367,
the fortieth year of King Edward III's reign, and had only one son, John Warren (-Y) The
records show that John (-Y) was at least twenty-six years old at his mother's death.

John Warren,(-Y) son of Sir Edward,(-X) was knighted about 1372, possibly on his
being appointed to attend the King on his expedition to France. He was designated
"Baron Stokeporte". He married Margaret the daughter and heiress of Sir John Stafford
of Wickham. They had two daughters, Margaret and Isabel, and one son, Nicholas (-Z) Sir
John Warren (-Y) died in 1387 and was buried at Boton in Norfolk.

Nicholas de Warren (-Z) was about fourteen years old when he succeeded Sir
John.(-Y) He married Agnes, the daughter of Sir Richard de Wynnington. Their only son,
Sir Laurence de Warren,(A) was born about 1394 and was a minor at the time of his
father's death.

Sir Laurence (A) is said to have been in France with Henry V, when he died there.
He had been married to Margery the daughter of Hugh Bulkeley of Owre, in Shropshire
in 1413 and he died in 1444. He had two sons, John de Warren,(B) Ralph (Randall), and
five daughters, Margery, Joan, Cicely, Margaret and Elizabeth.

John de Warren (B) was born about 1414. He is described in 1458 as Lord of the
manors of Stockport, Poynton, Wood Plumpton, Forneby, Rotley, Boton and Skegeton.
He married Isabel Stanley, the daughter of Sir John Stanley of Latham, Knight of the
Garter and steward to the household of King Henry IV. The marriage covenant was dated
at Stockport 10 Henry V, John (B) being then only 8 years of age and his father in
France.... Sir John Stanley covenanted to procure the Pope's dispensation, the both
parties being within prohibited degrees.2 They eventually had nine children, five of them
sons.

John de Warren (B) died in 1475. His children were; Sir Laurence Warren, who
married Isabel the daughter of Sir Robert Leigh of Adlington; a second son, John
Warren, married to Ann the daughter of Lord Stafford; a third son, also John Warren,
married to Margaret Booth. Following, were Richard Warren,(C) Henry Warren, Parson of
Stockport and their sisters; Elizabeth, Jane, Margaret and Joan. The second son, John
Warren and his wife Ann had a daughter, Isabel (his heir) who married a John Warren 3
of Ightfield Salop. John and his wife Margaret nee Booth were the ancestors of the
Harpenden Warrens. On the Hertfordshire Visitation of 1634 he is numbered the fifth
son (not the third).

Sir Laurence and his wife, Isabel Leigh of Adlington, had a son, Sir John Warren.
He married, as his first wife, Eleanor, daughter of Sir Thomas Gerrard, by whom he had
Laurence Warren,who, as eldest, inherited the title of Baron Stockport.4 There was also a
second son, William, who had several distinguished descendants. There were several
other children, who do not appear to have been researched.

1 Joan had been divorced from Sir John Arderne in 1332.
1 Ormerod quoted in The History of Cheshire page 682.
3 According to the Warren of Poynton pedigree there would seem to be some confusion between the two
cited sons of John de Warren (B). The third child John may have been John Warren, of the Ightfield
family. Although JohnÕs wife is not mentioned in LeycesterÕs account of the Booths of Dunham, she
may have been a daughter of that house, or of a younger son of the Barton Booths?
4 Visitation 1580.

The Chequered Wallers page 14

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Laurence Warren, Lord Stockport, had two marriages. Firstly, to Margaret the
daughter of Sir Piers Leigh of Lyme by whom he had Edward, Rannulph, Laurence,
George, and a second Edward. His daughters were Cicely, Mabel, Helen, Margaret,
Dorothy, Ann, Catherine, Jane and Isabel. There were, apparently, no children from his
second marriage to Sibil, the widow of William de Honford. The descendants of
Laurence carried the baronetcy until the nineteenth century. Lord Bulkeley had licence in
1802 to assume the name of Warren and to bear the arms of Warren quarterly and the
Warren of Poynton crest. This grant became exhausted upon the decease of the grantee,
without issue in 1822.

The line of descent we shall follow is through the fourth son of John de
Warren (B), Richard Warren (C), born about 1448. From the Ormerod Pedigree the
migration of the Hertfordshire Wallers can be approximately dated; i.e., John (B) died in
the 14th year of Edward IV's reign (1475). Thus his grandson, William,(D) born circa
1481 brings us to the end of Edward IV's reign in 1483 and into the troubled era of
Richard III and Henry VII (Tudor), when it appears that this cadet branch of the Warrens
of Poynton came south to Hertfordshire. Before I attempt to elucidate this descent and its
political background, it is necessary to examine Henry Tudor's antecedents.

The table below lists the generations of the Warrens of Poynton to about 1450,
partly extracted from the full genealogical tree drawn up by Watson 1 and then follows the
Richard Warren (C) line to Bassingbourn.

Reginald de Warenne (-R) m Aldelia de Mowbray
William Warren (-R) m Isabel de Haydon
Sir John Warren (-S) m Alice de Townsend
John Warren (-T) m Joan de Port
Sir Edward Warren (-V) m Maud Skegeton de Nerford
Sir Edward Warren (-X) m Cecily de Eton (Eaton)
Sir John Warren (-Y) m Margaret Stafford (1)
Nicholas Warren (-Z) m Agnes Wynnington
Sir Laurence Warren (A) m Margery Bulkeley
John Warren (B) m Isabel Stanley
Richard Warren (C) m
William Warren als Waller (D) m
William Warren als Waller (E) m Mawde.
William Warren als Waller (F) m Elizabeth Hammond
John Warren als Waller (G) m Margaret

1 Watson's History of the Earls of Warren and Surrey.

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Henry Tudor and the Warren als Wallers

The accession of Henry VII, the first of the Tudor dynasty, is generally taken as
the end of the middle ages and the commencement of modern times.

Henry instituted the Star Chamber and abolished Liveries, thus contributing to the
break up and the destruction of the old Anglo-Norman nobility and their families, such as
had survived the Wars of the Roses. Almost the entire royal house of the Plantagenets
was destroyed by murder, direct or legalised. It was left to Henry VII's son, Henry VIII to
complete this work and institute an entirely new dynasty. He was less successful in this
task than the Tudors would have hoped. Certain of the Anglo-Norman families carried as
much royal blood of Normans and Plantagenets as did the Tudors, especially on the
distaff side and, as such, any of them could have been a threat to the descendant of the
double adultery of John of Gaunt and Katherine Swynford, no matter how legalised that
union.

Henry Tudor was the son of Margaret Beaufort, by her second marriage with
Edmund Tudor, Earl of Richmond and her only child. Margaret Beaufort's third marriage
was to Henry Stafford and her fourth marriage was to Thomas Stanley, later Earl of
Derby. Margaret Beaufort was the great-granddaughter of Catheryn Swynford, the
mistress and (later) the third wife of John of Gaunt - son of Edward III. The Beauforts
were debarred by Act of Parliament from the succession to the throne.

There is some doubt whether Henry's paternal grandfather, Owen Tudor married
the widow of Henry V, Queen Catherine of Valois in 1425, because, very belatedly, after
the birth of their fifth child, the King's Council ordered them to separate. Owen Tudor
and his sons Edmund and Jasper escaped to Wales - Owen was later taken prisoner and
beheaded on the orders of Edward IV. After Henry Tudor became king, Edmund Tudor
was created Earl of Richmond in 1452 and declared legitimate by Parliament. Jasper
Tudor married Catherine Woodville and was created Earl of Pembroke and Bedford, but
left no legitimate children.

Margaret Beaufort was a remarkable woman, who never ceased plotting against
the family of York in what was finally a successful effort to replace them by the doubtful
claimant of Lancaster, her son, Henry Tudor. She was hand-in-glove with John Morton,
Bishop of Ely from whom came most of the pro-Lancaster propaganda, especially that
aimed against Richard III. She was regarded by Henry VII as heiress of Lancaster,
however tenuous this claim. He was wise to base his title to the throne on "conquest" and,
obliquely, through his wife, Edward IV's daughter, Elizabeth.

It is interesting to note that Henry read in French, for preference, to the end of his
life. Policy made him boost his Welsh strain, but this was tenuous and as illegitimate as
his maternal side, the Beaufort Family. However, his "legitimacy" was endorsed by
Parliament.

We have, perhaps, grown cynical in these days of media exposure, discovering
that nearly all incoming powers commit mayhem on the documents of their predecessors.
In this present day and age shredders do excellent work; in the past a good bonfire
helped. This practice of changing the past was common; William Cecil, Elizabeth's chief
minister, is suspected of weeding out documents of the previous reign.1 Apparently there
were only twenty-five English documents for the first six months of the reign, compared
with one hundred and eighty-seven for the similar period of Elizabeth's. Other archives
show similar imbalances.

1 i.e. Mary I.

The Chequered Wallers page 16

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Henry VII suppressed the Act of Parliament "Titulus Regius" ordering it to be
repealed without being read, and the Act itself be destroyed.1 Had it been founded on a
legal fiction there would have been no need for its suppression. The Act based itself on
Stillington, the Bishop of Bath's evidence that Edward IV was married to Lady Eleanor
Butler, daughter of the Earl of Shrewsbury. This was put to parliament by him and his
witnesses on 9 June 1483 and the evidence was accepted.

One of the most telling points (if oblique) to confirm the Eleanor Butler - Edward
IV marriage was the haste and secrecy of Edward's marriage to Elizabeth Woodville.
Warwick was at that moment negotiating a marriage between Edward and a French
princess. As soon as one realises that Edward's matrimonial status is in question, the
French marriage becomes a very tricky proposition -one thing to cozen an English
Gentlewoman - but consider the ramifications when a Princess of France is concerned!
No wonder Edward took the first likely possibility to back off. On one side was trouble
while on the other Edward could pander to his easy fancy. He never was particularly
faithful to his women.

When considering the histories of this time, it should be remembered that most
authorities took Sir Thomas More's so called account of events in 1483 - 1485 as proven
but in fact More's narrative was received from the previously mentioned John Morton, one
time Bishop of Ely. Sir Thomas was a dependant of Morton in his youth. These events
took place when Sir Thomas was six years old. He was a Tudor servant and minister
(Henry VIII's chancellor) before the events that brought him, as a "Man for all Seasons"
to the headman's block.

It is interesting, too, that Richard Fox became Bishop of Bath and Wells. What
an opportunity for one of Henry's henchmen to fudge evidence of the Eleanor Butler
marriage! Titulus Regius declared the children of Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville
illegitimate. Repealing and suppressing that act made Elizabeth legitimate once more.
However it also made her brothers Edward and Richard heirs to the throne.

It seems likely that Henry VII was involved in the murder of the Princes in the
Tower, said to have been ordered by Richard III: In 1483/84 the only English accusation
against Richard III of the murder of his nephews comes from Croyland (in the Fen
country) well under the influence of John Morton. The other accusation, made in France,
after Morton had escaped there, could well have stemmed from the same source. Sir
Thomas More accuses (the Morton manuscript) James Tyrell of the murder of the two
boys between 7 and 15 July 1483 with helpers. Polydore Virgil (Henry VIII's historian)
says the deed was done somewhat later when Richard III was in York mentioning a
different set of helpers.

It is documented that in mid June 1483, after Edward's death in April 1483, both
children, Edward and Richard, were living in the Tower, apparently well and healthy under
the guardianship of Richard III. However, no-one will ever know if James Tyrell had the
boys murdered in or about 1485, or whether they were saved and hidden away. Folklore
is full of this sort of situation. Edmund de la Pole fled the country in 1499, after a
manslaughter case for which he was pardoned. He refugeed in France, at Castle Guisnes,
where Sir James Tyrell was in command, an appointment he was given by Henry circa
1486/87, presumably as a reward for services rendered. This flight was said to have
perturbed Henry VII, who took immediate steps to silence James Tyrell. He was inveigled
from Castle Guisnes, taken to the Tower and executed without trial in 1502.

That two children's skeletons were discovered in Stuart times, just where (in
More's narrative) they were expected to be, is not decisive. Children's skeletons could be
obtained at any time. If More says where the children were buried it must have been court

1 Just by chance the original draft of this Act was discovered in the Tower records during the following
Stuart dynasty, when it was no longer important to the Succession. The full text was printed in 1611
by Speed.

The Chequered Wallers page 17

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knowledge. So why were the skeletons not produced in the Simnel and Warbeck revolts
to quash their claims, especially after enough time had passed, after 1483/85, for the time
of the deaths to be unprovable?

So, who killed them? Henry, to whom they were a danger? Buckingham, who
was also a royal claimant or Richard III, to whom they were no threat in 1483/4, he being
the King de jure and de facto? Why no accusation by Henry VII in 1483/1485? Nothing
until 1502 - when Tyrrell, without trial or confession, was executed by Henry -a week
before Arthur Prince of Wales' marriage to Catherine of Aragon.

Other interested parties were Elizabeth the Queen Dowager who died in 1492 and
Elizabeth, the wife of Henry VII who died after ill-health (a pregnancy, from which she
did not recover) in February 1503. Thus, two valuable witnesses, were no longer available

-and, moreover, they were the two most likely to have requested an investigation, i.e. their
mother and their sister.
It is a telling fact that the murder of the two boys was not investigated until 1502,
when the Tudor heir's Spanish marriage was being negotiated and Henry's title seemed an
important factor to the Spaniards. The Spanish royals (Ferdinand and Isabella), when
giving consent for the marriage of Arthur, Prince of Wales to Catherine of Aragon, were
most careful to point out that this marriage could not take place while there was any
danger that the upstart Tudors should be in anyway replaced by any of the Plantagenet
stock.

Rights or wrongs apart, most historians are agreed that the treachery of the
Stanleys gave the battle of Bosworth Field in 1485 to Henry Tudor, who proceeded to
consolidate his gains by every means available to him. This matter does touch the
Poynton family very nearly. Consider the marriages with the Stanleys and also the
Buckinghams (Staffords). Both these families were either Lancastrian or adherents of the
Woodvilles - the main opposition on the English side to Richard III. The other side was a
French invasion backing Henry.

Henry was not a brave man, but he was devious in all his actions, and he was on
the horns of a dilemma. Is it too much to assume, with the morality not only of the times,
but of seizers of power in general, that the easiest way out was taken? With Richard dead,
Elizabeth married to Henry, the death of the children and any other heirs of the
Plantagenets left (and there were several) disposed of, there could be no successful
challenge to Tudor power. As we have seen, the Warrens of Poynton were amongst those
who were said to carry Plantagenet blood although, in point of fact, they were of true
Norman descent. I suspect that the supposed illegitimate descent of the Warrens of
Poynton from the eighth Earl of Warren and Surrey and his mistress Maud de Nereford,
which became the accepted theory (by Vincent 1), was first suggested at this time.

While it is tempting to put out arguments for and against Plantagenet and Tudor, it
is fruitless to do so today. I would suggest however that both the Warrens of Poynton
and of Hertfordshire could well have considered these matters of life and death
importance. At the time the Hertfordshire scions were establishing themselves in
Harpenden and in Ashwell and Bassingbourn, lineally about 17 and 22 miles from
Harpenden, (Bassingbourn being just in the border of Cambridgeshire), it may appear that
the senior branch was resigned with the Tudors, however it was not until 1499 that all
hope died for the White Rose, with the judicial murders of Warwick, et al, although there
were still a few members of the de la Pole family alive.

The first half of the 16th Century must have been a trying time for many a family.
Coats were being turned and who could say where the next blow would fall? Henry VII
died in 1509 but troubles continued throughout the following reigns. Due to Stanley

1 This was partly done by confusing two identities. Maud Skegton de Nerford and Matilda de Nerford,
termed the daughter of a Knight, William Nyerford. see Watson

The Chequered Wallers page 18

.
influence one would think that the Poynton family would have been (at least) confirmed in
the Stockport Barony -but not all the Stanleys were "reliable" and when an attainder
produced forfeited estates for the King's coffers, (his avarice being what it was), it might
well have been prudent to opt out.

According to Watson, Elizabeth I (who was no fool) received a report on the
Poynton family circa 1570. She was just as parsimonious as her grandfather and would
likely prefer her relatives to benefit from the break up of the Warenne estates, rather than
distant connections.

By 1570 much of the de Warenne estate was in the possession of the Howards
(relatives of Elizabeth I), with the Poynton family written off as being illegitimate
descendants of John de Warenne, the eighth Earl of Surrey and his mistress, Maud de
Nereford. The senior branch continued to live as members of the gentry of Cheshire,
claiming the Barony of Stockport and Poynton. Their large families since the mid-
fifteenth century must have quite taxed the family wealth and no doubt, when the younger
members of the family left to seek their fortunes further afield, their departure may have
been somewhat more a relief than a sorrow.

No matter what difficulties arose for the senior branch, I deduce the Hertfordshire
scions remained secret adherents of the Plantagenets. The anti-Tudor factor could well
have pushed them into Nonconformity; they probably felt deprived, resentful and eager to
dissociate themselves -even to the extent of changing the name. Adopting "Waller" could
have been by chance originally but association with Waller Family of Kent would have
chimed well with the displaced Warrens.

The Waller family of Kent was extremely Nonconformist, so confusion with the
Wallers of Kent could have been courted. Beyond claiming descent from the Warrens of
Poynton, none of the Hertfordshire Warrens specify clearly, the exact line of descent. It
was only the Bassingbourn-Ashwell Warren als Wallers who made the name-change, in
about 1500. It was confirmed in 1572 and further, noted upon the Hertfordshire
Visitation of 1634. A family name change might have helped to cover their tracks but first
names could still be handed down. So it is logical that William Warren als Waller (E) born
about 1508 of Bassingbourn and Ashwell has a brother named after his grandfather
Richard Warren.(C)

The Chequered Wallers page 19

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The Warrens called Waller

William,(D) the son of Richard Warren (C) of Poynton was born in about 1481.
We have a good record of his children and their wills combine to produce conclusive
evidence of the family, even though the marriage details have not yet been found.
William (D) was mentioned in the will of his son Richard who designates his brother as
"William Warren the son of William Warren the Elder" to be supervisor of the will dated
28 March 1557. The reason for this was that three generations of William Warrens were
living at the time and this form served to differentiate them.

Numerous Armingford Hundred Lay Subsidy references between 1499 and about
1550 for the surroundings give an idea of significant names and places:

Kneesworth 1499 William Waren
Bassingbourn Richard Waller
Bassingbourn John Waller
Bassingbourn 1523 1 Richard Waller
Bassingbourn Thomas Waller
Bassingbourn John Waller
Bassingbourn 1541 William Waler
Bassingbourn 1547 William Waller
Bassingbourn Richard Waller
Bassingbourn Anthony Waller

In 1557, William (D) would have been approximately 75 years of age. William (E)
the brother of Richard (will above mentioned), would have been about 50 years old. He is
designated as "William the Younger" also, by his brother Anthony of Kneesworth in
who's will he is nominated as a witness. William the Younger's son, born about 1532
would have been 25 years of age in 1557 and was referred to as "William Junior".

The descendants of William Warren (D) spread to several Hertfordshire,
Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire villages; Ashwell, Therfield, Bedford, Kneesworth, and
Melbourne. Later they travelled a little further afield, intermarrying with several County
families, for example the Boulnesses (who were cousins of the Snaggs of Letchworth),
the Grays, and the Glascocks of Essex.

The eldest son was of course William (E) but considering first the other four sons,
they were, Thomas, John, Richard and Anthony. Thomas unfortunately, does not seem to
have made a will. John of Ashwell and Bedford however, has been reasonably well
documented and in his will dated 11, January 1566/7 gives his name as John Waller of
Ashwell. Although he marries twice, only the second wife's name; Elizabeth, is known.
His first born was Robert who became Mayor of Bedford from 1583 to 1585. John had
other sons Edward and William and several daughters. Interestingly, his grandson,
named after Robert also became Mayor of Bedford in 1603. In John's will, his brother
William Warren,(E) brother Richard's wife Alice Waller and William Warren (F) junior are
witnesses. John's wife Elizabeth, is the executor.

1 Lay Subsidy dates shown thus: 14 Henry VIII

The Chequered Wallers page 20

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Richard Warren als Waller of Bassingbourn, named after his grandfather, married
Alice, as mentioned above. They had several children, the eldest was probably Richard,
then William, followed by Nicolas, Henry and Alice. All seem to have survived and
several had issue, though the daughter Alice's fortunes are not recorded. William had not
married it seems at the time Richard was "sick in body" and testifying his will, thus
omitting to mention William, perhaps because he was given up for producing any heir.
He did later marry and produced two daughters.1 As fate would have it, Richard 2 was the
one who had no heirs, so he passed his inheritance to his brother Nicolas or Nicholas,
who did have a son (Richard). Rychard Waller and Thomas Pynke were Bassingbourn
Churchwardens during 1534/1536. In Richard's will, dated 28 March 1557, he is named
as Richard Warren otherwise called Waller. His brother "William Warren (E) the son of
William Warren the elder" was designated as supervisor.

Anthony Waller of Kneesworth was born about 1510. Kneesworth is very close
to Bassingbourn and it seems likely that some smallholdings in this and surrounding
parts belonged to the Warrens from earlier times. Anthony married Margery and they
had yet another William, then Thomas, Joan, Anthony, Jeremy and Ellen. It is known that
William at least, had grandchildren. Anthony's will is dated 22 January 1556/7.3 In this
will there are legacies to John Waller and his wife Margery. His brother "William
Warren (E) the younger" is designated as a witness.

Returning to the eldest of all the above brothers again, William Warren als
Waller (E) (the Younger) married Maud or Maude in about 1530 and they had William,(F)
Edward, Richard, Henry and John. Edward and Richard both married daughters of
Thomas Snagg and John married a Katherine or Catherine Lawrence to whom three girls
and one son were born. His name was Richard, he married Anne and they had several
grandchildren. Henry's fate is unknown. Bassingbourn Parish records reveal that William
the younger, or (as written) "Wyllyam Waller" was churchwarden with one Tryamour
Hayton at Bassingbourn in 1527 and again shared the role with John Boulness during
1527/1528.

The eldest son William (F) (junior) was about 40 years old when he was granted
the Warren of Poynton 4 arms in 1572. He had married his wife Elizabeth, the daughter
of William Hammond of Much Monden sometime between 1550 and 1567.5 Perhaps
this required him to claim his hereditary, as her father William Hammond, was an armiger,
the son of Christopher Hammond who was descended from the Hamonds of Yorkshire.
Perhaps it just took William some time to collect his evidence and arrange it into the
required form for the Heralds. Alternatively it might have been for the benefit of the
children.

William (F) died at Ashwell, Hertfordshire possibly as late as 1610,6 (about 78
years old), because the will was only proved after his eldest son's. However, this was
more likely for legal purposes than that his son predeceased him. Had he survived for so
long after 1599 a new will could have been made. The six sons and a daughter mentioned
in his will made 3 May 1599 are: William (and six children of this son at Bassingbourn);
Edward, John,(G) Gawen, Andrew, Henry and Elizabeth (with children). Two other
daughters, Susan and Mary are not mentioned. He owned land in Bassingbourn which
passed to the children of his eldest son William, specifically, to his grandson William,

1 will dated 5 Feb. 1572, William Waller
2 will dated 23 Oct. 1580, Richard Waller
3 The year is given as 1556/7 because, in 1752, the Julian calendar was changed to the Gregorian "New
Style". The Julian New Year had started on 25 March. From 1752 the New Style year commenced on 1
January, so for some time, between January and March, two year dates were often given.
4 With differences for a younger house of Poynton.
5 The date10 October 1550 for the marriage is given in Burkes Irish Family Records. According to
information in the 1599 will of William (F) the year 1560 seems more likely.
6 see will dated 31 March 1599, probate December 1610. The son's will was probate 10 November
1610. The earliest date given in Ashwell PR burials and the only William Waller about this time was
buried 27 September 1604.

The Chequered Wallers page 21

.
who married Marcie Dunn on 3 March 1616 in Bassingbourn. They had children born in
Duxford, Ashwell and Bassingbourn. William and Edward were made joint executors of
the will. It is evident that Edward was an intelligent individual, had ambition and was
married (possibly on the point of marriage). If he was the sixth son, he must have been
under age but at least 18, one would think, unless there were two, possibly three elder
brothers already deceased by 1599 or not mentioned. Certainly, the will clearly states that
Andrew and Henry are under 22 years of age. And possibly Gawen in the same context.

William's (F) eldest son William married Agnes Gray. By the end of 1599 they
had six children, subsequently at least two more were born, since in his will,1 he names
eight: Edward, Henrie, Nathaniel, John, Thomas, Elizabeth, Mercye and William. He
mentions his brothers in law William Gray and John Sell, husbands of Susan 2 and Mary
respectively and nominates William and Agnes executors. Overseers are: Andrew and
John Waller (brothers); Thomas Boulnest of Little Hermitage, both brothers-in-law and
Ffolk Marshall. There is an extremely detailed and extensive schedule of properties given
and finally the document is witnessed by Thomas Boulnest (Bownest); the Vicar of
Ashwell, Ffolk Marshall and William Gray. It is interesting to see how many marriages
there were between the Wallers and the Grays!

William's (F) son, Edward Warren als Waller of Ashwell and Symonds Inn,
London, became an attorney. As soon as he inherited, he bought a manor in Ashwell. His
first wife, Margaret Gray, died about 1610 and he remarried to Margaret, daughter of
Richard Glascock, of Essex.3 Perhaps this marriage called for Edward to apply for the
arms, which were granted.

There are three families of Warrens noted in the visitations of Hertfordshire in
1634. They are:

Firstly, the Warrens of Colney, bearing the chequy Or et Azure arms with
the canton Gules, a lion rampant Argent with a wyvern Argent for crest, a mullet
within an annulet for difference. This family descends from Laurence Warren of
Poynton, Cheshire, also called ancestor of Warren of Aldenham co. Hertford who
was himself a younger son of Laurence Warren of Poynton.

Secondly, the Warrens of Harpenden, also bearing the same arms, but with
a bordure Ermine. They stem back to John Warren (B) of Poynton, who married
Isabel, daughter of Sir John Stanley and their son John who married Margarett
Booth, Daughter of Sir William Booth.

Thirdly, the Warren alias Wallers of Ashwell: The visitation illustrates the
descent of Edward Warren alias Waller who was the son of William Warren.(F)
Edward's arms are; chequy Or et Azure, a Fleur-de-Lis Argent within a bordure
engrailed Sable, on a canton Gules a lion rampant Argent double-queued of the
third.

The fleur-de-lis as we know was granted according to heraldic custom for a sixth
son. The Harley records of 1572 4 show that his father, William Warren alias Waller (F)
was designated: "of Bassingbourn Co. Cambridge, Gent., descended of a younger house
of Warren of Poynton in Cheshire." The arms are also illustrated showing a Ducal
Coronet above, the lion to the left, the bordered shield and indicated blue and gold
chequers, (without further additions). Below this there is a pedigree illustration showing
William (F) and some of his sons; Edward in the last, right hand side position.

1 probate 10 Nov. 1610, publshed 23 Dec. 1610.
2 Named in a marriage, Therfield PRs but legibility precludes certainty of whether to aWilliam or a
Nicholas Gray 17 May 1589. Agnes WWaller (Gray) names her daughter Mary Sell in her will of 3 Jan
1624.
3 see Vis. of Essex 1614 for the Glascock pedigree and this marriage
4 Harley MS ref. 1546 Folio 114.

The Chequered Wallers page 22

.
The arms as described in the Heralds Visitation of Hertfordshire, specifically of
Ashwell are illustrated in the Harley records 1 on various folios (1634) showing also with
pedigree illustrations the descent of Edward Warren alias Waller and his brother Henry,
then of Edward's children, Richard, Phillip, Thomas and John, sons by his second wife
Margaret, daughter of Richard Glascock and sons Edward, Joshua, William and Jonathan
by his first wife, Margaret, daughter of Thomas Gray.

The Warrens of Harpenden and the Bassingbourn- Ashwell Warren als Waller
family intermarried with several of the Hertfordshire gentry, especially the Boulness
(Boulniste) family of Bassingbourn and their cousins, the Snaggs of Letchworth. Henry,
the son of John Warren and Margarett Booth married Allice, daughter of Thomas Snagg.
Over the generations, they were quite prosperous, for William's (F) grandson Nathaniel was
sent to Cambridge University, where he read in Pembroke Hall 1618 and transferred to
Queens in 1621, where he graduated a BA and took his MA during 1626, in Holy Orders.
He was first at Peterborough and later at Little Buckenham, Norfolk in 1638. The
William who married Marcie Dunn, was able to leave 100 pounds to each of his six
children when he died at about 45 years of age in 1635.

One of the Warren of Poynton smallholdings near Bassingbourn and Ashwell in
the 1500's is known from an Indenture (Ex Guildhall, London) dated 19 February 1551.
Laurence Warren purchased property from Hugh Stukely, of London, in Bygrave Herts.
very near to Ashwell, where he paid taxes in 1545. This Laurence Warren, born in 1502,
was the son of Sir Laurence Warren of Poynton and Margaret, daughter of Sir Piers
Leigh of Lyme. The Indenture was signed by Laurence's brothers John and George and
by a William Warren.

There are descendants of William Warren als Waller (F) now resident at the
property mentioned above; Mrs. Penelope Topham and her daughter. They are
descended through Richard and the Irish Wallers.

To explain this Irish connection, let us briefly follow the family of Edward Warren
als Waller of Ashwell, attorney of Symonds Inn. His eldest son Edward was executor of
his will of 1640. He sold the family manor ten years after his father's decease 2 in 1650.
William was probably the second son, baptised 18 August 1605. Jonathan Waller, also
an attorney, baptised in Ashwell on 10 January 1609, married Mary,3 the daughter of
Giles Humberstone some time after 1628.

Humberstone was given as a first or second Christian name to several of
Jonathan's descendants. Jonathan and Mary's children were Jonathan, Edward,
Humberstone and John. Although Jonathan Waller is designated "Gentleman" in his will
of 1662, he seems to have been more interested in settling his children in Trade than
establishing an estate. His children Humberstone and John were both put out as
apprentices.4 Of the daughters, Elizabeth was married to Sir John Johnson, a London
Alderman; Mary married Ralph Baldwin (Baldwyn) a clergyman of Shepreth, while
Susannah married John Clayton of London. Their youngest brother John, inherited the
Chequers Inn at Royston, with land in Therfield and Bassingbourn. The Chequers
eventually came into the hands of Elizabeth Johnson nee Waller's descendants.

Completing the family of Edward's first wife Margaret Gray, two other children
were Jayne and Joshua. Jayne was later married to a Mr. Jordan. Joshua was admitted a
pensioner of Queens College, Cambridge. Edward and his second wife, Margaret
Glascock had Richard, Phillip, Thomas and John. Margaret had a sister, Elisabeth, who

1 Harley MS ref. 1234 Folio 142 Edward & Henry;

Harley MS ref. 1504 Folio 143b.
2 see the V.C. history of Herts.
3 from the will 6 September 1627 of Giles Humberstone of Walkerne.
4 Humberstone in London, as a grocer, where he died without issue in 1689, although he left lands in or
near Royston, Cambridgeshire to his brother, John.

The Chequered Wallers page 23

.
married another Hertfordshire gentleman, Thomas Bowles of nearby Wallingford. This
family was connected to the Barringtons, (one of whom was a Sheriff of Hertfordshire)
and they were connected to the FitzWilliams and the Boulnest family in Bassingbourn.

Margaret also had a brother in an influential position in Ireland, so it is not
surprising that her eldest son, Richard, migrated to Ireland after his father's decease in
1639/40. Richard held a command in Cromwell's army and was granted lands at Cully,
Newport, County Tipperary. Building on the sight of the old Ryan Tower, he established
Castle Waller, the seat of the Irish Wallers for several generations. Richard married
Dorothy, whose descendants bear the Warren Waller arms to the present day, as recorded
in Burke's Irish Family Records.

Towards the end of the seventeen hundreds, a descendant, George Waller,
purchased Prior Park, Nenagh, County Tipperary, which the family held until recent times
when the heiress Sarah Frances de Warrene Waller moved into Nenagh itself. Branches
of this family have emigrated back to England and to many far flung parts of the
Commonwealth. The current head of the family, Sarah's cousin, Brigadier Hardress
Waller M.B.E., MC, lives near Nenagh.

Edward's brother, Henry, was a Captain of Artillery in London. He passed away
at a young age in 1631 at his London home, a house in Watling Street. He left three small
daughters. Another brother, Gawen, also died in London, leaving a family, but the brother
with whom we are most concerned is John,(G) yeoman of Ashwell.

The Chequered Wallers page 24

.
The Wallers of Ashwell and St. Albans

One can take it that, at this particular period of English history, the middle classes
were becoming increasingly viable. The lawyers, merchants and divines may have been of
little account socially, but may well have been more comfortably off than the minor
landowners. The Wallers, were by and large, on the left-wing of politics, which in the
seventeenth century, meant Cromwellians. However, that did not necessarily mean that
they took up arms with the Parliamentarians. Sympathies can be taken out in talk, in the
odd donation to Party funds, and joining a demonstration or two. In the seventeenth
century one would find extreme Leftists among the Nonconformists, and later, among
sects like the Quakers.

This is precisely where one finds a section of John Waller's (G) descendants. One
can picture relatives' children turning up their noses at this extremism, which could never
have been quite respectable. However, by the end of the century, several of the backsliders
had returned to the Established Church.

Between 1642 and 1651 came the Civil War and with the Parliamentarians
victorious, Charles I was executed in 1649. His son, Charles II was routed at Worcester
in 1651 and fled to France. He did not return until 1660. (It is interesting that the Waller
family from Kent were related to the Cromwells and the Hampdons.)

John Waller,(G) yeoman of Ashwell married Margaret.1 He made his will on 18
May 1624 and was buried there on 25 May 1624.2 The will names seven sons and a
daughter, Susan.3 His eldest son was John, then follow William, Samuel, Thomas,
Edward,(H) Jonathan and Andrew. John inherits the bulk of the land while each of the rest
of the boys gets on average 15 plus acres. John, William and Samuel were less than
twenty-four years old, the rest minors. Susan received 8 acres plus. William is made
executor and given some of the equipment permanently and the profits of the land for the
first few years and then profit of the respective sections until each of the remaining
children are 21. Probably, Edward the attorney helped to work out this interesting
arrangement.

John junior married Mary Plomer and they had William, John, Anne, Thomas and
Abraham. John and his family reverted to using the Warren surname. His brother
William may have moved away from the area as no information about him has yet been
found. Samuel also has not been traced, apart from a baptismal entry of 10 March 1605.

Thomas is quite well known since he made a will and Married a young widow,
Mary Turner whose maiden name was Wenham, details and dates of which are in the
Appendix. Thomas was also a churchwarden. He and his wife had several children.

Jonathan also married and he was buried a Quaker in Ashwell. From his nephew

John's will,4 one of his sons was also called John. Susan married Thomas Plomer
(probably Mary's brother?) and Andrew married Hanna. Apart from Jonathan, Edward (H)
seems to be the only member of this generation to be involved with the Quakers.

Edward (H)lived to be near 85 years of age. He was buried in Ashwell on 7 May
1700. His will was not made probate for 18 years. He married Susan and it appears that

1 Margaret's name was discovered from Weston BTs showing the baptismal entry of their son Samuel,
baptised 10 March 1605. There is a duplicate entry in Ashwell of this baptism, the mother's name
omitted.
2 see P.R.O Herts 138 HW 74
3 Susan was baptised in Ashwell 14 June 1609 (ex BTs).
4 John Waller of Ashwell, will made 21 April 1716

The Chequered Wallers page 25

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all their children were brought up as Nonconformists. Those children were Edward, John,
Jonathan,(J) Thomas, and Andrew. His daughters-in-law, according to Ashwell parish
records, were also Quakers. One was Dorothy, the wife of Edward junior and Mary, the
wife of Andrew was another of the same persuasion. Several of this family were indicted
at the Hitchin Quarter Sessions for not attending Church in 1694. Edward's (H) will, made
30 April 1700 mentions Susan "my dearly beloved wife"; his brother Jonathan; John
Waller his son, sole executor and comments that Thomas is of London and Andrew is
deceased. Witnesses were: John Lilly, Andrew Blewett and William Phillips.

Edward and Dorothy Cumberland (from Hitchin) had several children; Jonathan,
Edward Cumberland (Waller), William, Susannah (Later married to Daniel Eling) and
Dorothy (later married to John Penn), were baptised in the Ashwell Church, showing that
the young family returned to the Established Church. Edward, (born 9 November 1685)
was baptised at two years on 16 December 1690, (together with elder siblings Jonathan,
seven and Susanna, six). His grandson, a Robert Waller, lived in King's Langley and had
a family there between 1799 and 1818. The name Edward Cumberland Waller is noted
there again on 27 January 1847, with his and a brother Robert Albert's baptism, twins;
born to Edward Cumberland Waller and his wife, Mary Ann (nee Hobbs) who were
married 3 September 1832 at St. Georges Church, Hannover Square, London.

John Waller, Edward's (H) executor, married Anne Humberstone of Weston at
Letchworth on 13 September 1672. Their eldest daughter, Sarah, was born at Stevenage
in 1673, she was later married to a Mr. King.1 John's other daughter, Elizabeth, married a
Mr. Powell. Since he had no male heir, in his will made at Ashwell 21 April 1716 he
mentions all his nephews and nieces. He does not seem to have joined the Society of
Friends, though he left widespread legacies to the Quakers, including those of Ashwell, at
considerable cost.

Thomas married Sarah Langthorne, (the daughter of Sarah Waller and William
Langthorne) and they had a son, Thomas, in Offley. Thomas senior was buried at
Weston 2 in 1749. Andrew and Mary had children Andrew, Susanna, Edward, Thomas,
Mary and John, all named in the wills of John 1716 and Edward 1718, except for Andrew,
who died young, circa 1713. 3

It is noteworthy that both the father's and the son John's wills were made probate
on 3 April 1718. Since John was the executor, it is evident that he postponed the legal
finalisation for as long as he could. The father's instructions required Jonathan to give
John a disclaimer of any dues or debts John might have owed him. John also inherits all
the land. By his name, Edward was probably the eldest and he would normally have
inherited most of the land, so it would seem some dispute had arisen, probably, over
religious differences.

The father, a Quaker made his will in 1700 (after Edward had returned to the
Established Church). John continued to maintain the Quaker interests, while holding
executive rights over the land until his will made on 21 April 1716, superseded by probate
on 3 April 1718. Though Edward was made the executor and Jonathan's eldest son was a
beneficiary, thus were given use of some of the land, it was conditional; requiring byways,
annual contributions and facilities to the Quakers, being subject to loss on default.
Edward made his will only two years after John's, on 29 June 1718. Jonathan (J) died
between the time of the said wills of his brothers.

In the times, it might have been thought a bit of a disaster not to have a male heir
as befell John but he made do with his faith and divested himself of his material

1 There is an earlier connection with the King family; Mary Waller married William King 19 April 1619
at Bassingbourn.
2 A Yeoman, according to the Parish Register, buried 1749.
3 Andrew Waller, Yeoman of Ashwell, will made 18 Feb 1713, in which all names of brothers and
sisters are confirmed

The Chequered Wallers page 26

.
possessions in the cause, with a little help from his Friends (legal advisers)? Edward was
virtually cut out but Jonathan's (J) son John probably did as well out of the deal as anyone
could have hoped. His grandfather had only inherited about 20 acres, after all, so there
could not have been much land left. Even if only in effect, the result was that John was to
manage another 16 acres for the Quakers (subject to the conditions and contributions),
presumably, he should have been able to make some profit of the situation.

It may be helpful if I list the descendants of John Waller (G) of Ashwell:

1st Generation. John Waller (G) married Margaret.
Children: John Warren.
William Waller.
Samuel Waller.
Thomas Waller.
Edward (H) Waller.
Jonathan Waller.
Andrew Waller & Susan (Plomer).
2nd Generation. Edward Waller (H) married Susan.
Children: Edward Waller.
John Waller.
Jonathan Waller. (J)
Thomas Waller.
Andrew Waller.
3rd Generation.
Eldest son.
Edward Waller married Dorothy
Cumberland of Hitchin.
Children: Jonathan Waller.
Edward Cumberland Waller.
William Waller.
Susanna (Eling) and Dorothy (Penn).
3rd Gen. 2nd son John Waller married Anne Humberstone
of Weston.
Children: Sarah (King) and Elisabeth (Powell).
4th Generation. Anna (Hammond).
3rd Gen. 3rd son Jonathan Waller (J) married Hannah
Children: Jonathan Waller.
John Waller.
Robert Waller (K) and Hannah Waller.
3rd Gen. 4th son Thomas Waller married Sarah Langthorne
(Daughter of Sarah Waller).
Children: Thomas Waller.
3rd Gen. 5th son Andrew Waller married Mary, (a Quaker).
Children: Andrew Waller .(Deceased 1713).
Edward Waller.
John Waller.
Thomas, Mary and Susanna Waller.

The Chequered Wallers page 27

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So it can be seen that there were family connections between the Wallers of
Ashwell, the Hammonds, and the Humberstones of Walkerne and Weston.1

It is common knowledge that Quakers in Hertfordshire were frequently maltsters.
In the early years of the sect, actively seeking converts by "spreading the word" was much
more usual than it became later. The malting trade gave fairly long periods of leisure, as
well as opportunities for travel about the countryside which chimed well with both
missionary and business activities. Malting and brewing were not frowned on by
Quakers, even if these activities were anathema to many Nonconformists later, particularly
the Methodists. The local malting lands were acquired by the Whitbread family, well-
known Quakers, about 1800.

Jonathan,(J) became a maltster, who married Hannah. Their children were
Jonathan, John, Robert (K) and Hannah. Jonathan (J) leased the tithes of the Manor
Westbury in Ashwell from the College of Pembroke Hall, 16 July 1689. He passed away
circa 1717, being in his mid to late 60's. His son John inherited the use of 25 plus acres
from his uncle John in 1718.

Jonathan's (J) son Robert (K) married at Graveley, Hertfordshire to Elizabeth Bishop
on 29 December 1706. Robert (K)and Elizabeth had two children, firstly, Robert, who was
buried at Offley in October 1709 and then another son whom they also named Robert,(L)
baptised in Offley on 29 July 1712.

Both Robert Waller(K) and his wife Elizabeth were buried in Offley.2 Robert (K)
was tenant of the Miss Sally Barrington Estate.3 There is, as we have seen, a remote
marriage connection between Wallers and Barringtons, both via the Bowles cousins in
Ashwell and Wallington and via the Boulness family at Bassingbourn. Robert (K) is a
legatee named in the wills of his uncles, Edward and John Waller, both of Ashwell.

Robert Waller (L) junior, married Mary Phillips in Offley on 4 October 1739 (reconsecrating
the marriage?). Their eldest son, Daniel Waller was baptised there before
this marriage-date. It is probable that Robert (L) and Mary married earlier by Quaker rites,
there being no hint or suggestion of illegitimacy on the baptism of Daniel.4 They had
four other children, baptised between 1741 and 1758; Ann, John,(M) Mary and William,
also recorded in the Offley parish registers.

The connection between the Waller and Phillips families evidenced in this

marriage of Robert (L) and Mary, is shown overleaf in the Humberstone wills, besides
having been hinted at in the witnessing of Edward Waller's (H) will of 1700 by William
Phillips.

1 According to Mr. Thomas Doig, of the Cambridge Folk Museum, who has undertaken a study of the
population drift in the Cambridgeshire/Hertfordshire borders, Weston was a favourite village in this area
for runaway marriages, so that little reliance can be placed on records stating 'of this parish' in the Weston
Parish Registers. A grandparent living in Weston (or having been born there) would have been sufficient
qualification. This information is of significance when referring to Parish Registers in this area,
particularly when tracing subsequent Waller generations.
2 Elizabeth: 21 May 1762 and Robert: 12 January 1764.
3 Land Tax, Offley, 15 June 1753
4 16 March 1739. See PR. transcripts.

The Chequered Wallers page 28

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Precis of Humberstone wills showing Waller, Phillips, and Humberstone
connections:

1) Giles Humberstone of Walkerne - will dated 6 September 1627

wife: Mary nee Smartefoote, Executrice
children: Henry
Osmond
Edward
William
Thomas
Theodoria (married William Hammond,
Weston 1632)
Mary (married Jonathan Waller at Ashwell)
grandchildren: Edward (son of Thomas)

2) John Humberstone of Walkerne - will dated 4 February 1720

wife: Mary
children: Thomas

3) Thomas Humberstone of Walkerne - will dated 28 March 1723

wife: Mary
children: Daniel
Mary
Grace
Sarah

4) Thomas Humberstone of Walkerne - will dated 2 October 1770

children: Thomas (deceased)
James
Sarah Phillips (deceased) (Sarah
Humberstone married John Phillips of
Weston)
grandchildren: Thomas Phillips
Susannah Phillips
Laurence Humberstone (son of Thomas
deceased)
relationship
unnamed:
William Humberstone (son of Anne
Scales)

We observed that the Phillips family was connected closely to the Humberstones
and Wallers. John Humberstone 1 of Walkerne was the father of Thomas Humberstone 2
of Weston. In his will, Thomas mentions his daughter, Sarah, who was married to John
Phillips of Weston on 4 October 1744. Mary Phillips who married Robert Waller (L) was
of the same family.

Although Mary and Robert Waller (L) (he died in 1764) were buried in Offley, they
had clear connections with Weston: Three of their children appear in Weston parish
records. Both Mary and John (M) were baptised in Offley, but married in Weston.

1 will 4 February 1720/1
2 will 2 October 1770

The Chequered Wallers page 29

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William, their youngest son, appears at the age of 18 years on the Weston Militia List.
Other Waller cousins continue in Offley, but Robert (L) and Mary's children move away in
the last quarter of the eighteenth century.

As mentioned previously, there had been a dispute between the brothers John,
Edward and Jonathan (J) Probably, in time, after their deaths, there was a reconciliation
between the cousins in Ashwell and Offley, where Robert (K) had moved (circa 1709). His
grandson, John Waller,(M) can be found back in Ashwell on the militia lists of 1769 and
1772. His sister, Mary Waller was married in Weston to William Chalkley in 1772.
John (M) seems to have moved in the same social circles, as he also married in Weston on
23 December 1774 to Elizabeth Allen. He appears thereafter on the Weston militia lists
of 1775, 1778 and 1781, after which date he was removed, as he and Elizabeth his wife
had three children, which exempted him from further duty.

Turning aside from the direct line again, part of my research involved tracing
William Waller, woolcomber of Therfield. This branch of the Wallers probably descends
from the John Warren als Waller who married Katherine Lawrence 1 and their great
grandson Henry, mentioned in the 1652 will of Francis, though this is not proven.
William of Therfield, mentions in his will of 26 May 1712 his siblings, as follows:
Nathaniel, Henry, John, Andrew and Caleb, with sisters Mary and Grace. In his will of 20
November 1722, Henry Waller (The son of Henry and Mary and son of Henry above, if
one and the same), Gentleman of Bassingbourn, mentions his brother, Nathaniel Waller,
Nathaniel's wife Grace, nephews and nieces Henry, Andrew, Caleb and Mary. Caleb is an
uncommon Waller name that occurs in Duxford, as a marriage witness, and also among
the Waller cousins in Offley. Among the witnesses of William Waller of Therfield's
will 2 is an Elizabeth Allen. This Elizabeth Allen could have been related to the Elizabeth
Allen who married John Waller (M) in Weston. All these villages are in close proximity,
reached by foot or very easily by horse or pony and trap.

Although there were several Waller families in the area at the start of the century,
by the end of the eighteenth century they had left Ashwell. For a significant period of the
family history, during the best part of three hundred years evidently, they had enjoyed the
pleasant village life with reasonable prosperity. One of the last burials of the Chequered
Wallers noted on the parish registers was in 1800. As previously observed, their lands
were acquired by the Whitbread fraternity.

The peregrinations of the eighteenth century Wallers were only a sign of the
times. This was the "Age of Enlightenment" and change seeped down through the
Wallers as it did throughout Europe and England. Agriculture was becoming increasingly
scientific and with the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, more and more of the remaining
yeoman-class farmlands were being eaten up. The younger sons, particularly, were
drifting to the ever-growing cities and manufactories.

London was but a scant day's journey off, even by foot, and with the opening of
the canal system, it could indeed be said "down to the City and back, business done in a
se'enight". Those Wallers remaining in the Cambridge and Hertfordshire borders were
more likely to be woolcombers, cordwainers, innkeepers and small traders, than yeomen.
The landed-gentry of the family had sold up. If still on the land, they were agricultural
labourers; the ambitious ones had left for the towns and cities.

Typical of this generation were John (M) and Elizabeth Waller's children born in
Weston; William, the eldest on 9 September 1775, James (N) on 29 January 1777 and
Mary on 12 March 1779. James (N) joined the Hertfordshire Militia on 26 January 1797.
He remained on the strength until 24 January 1829, when he was honourably discharged.
He subsequently worked as a gardener into extreme old age. He married on 28 July 1816

1 see accompanying pedigree charts.
2 will 26 May 1712

The Chequered Wallers page 30

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in St. Albans 1 to Sarah Greene, the daughter of John Greene of Bunker's Farm, Abbots
Langley. James (N) and Sarah had three children; George,2 Sarah 3 and Charles,(O) who
was born in 1824.

George and Sarah Waller were baptised in Abbey Church, St. Albans.
Information concerning Charles,(O) whose baptism has not been found, was obtained from
the 1851 Census for Sopwell Lane, St. Albans and from his marriage certificate dated 17
June 1844.4 The census gives him as part of the household of his father, James,(N) together
with his mother Sarah, his wife Emma and their three children, Frederick,(P) Emma and
Elizabeth.

It was Frederick Waller (P) who finally left Hertfordshire and migrated to London,
where he married in 1865.

1 St. Stephens
2 born 29 September 1820
3 born 4 August, 1822
4 It is interesting that Charles Waller's marriage in St. Albans was witnessed by a Mary Ann Waller - see
the Cumberland Wallers of King's Langley.

The Chequered Wallers page 31

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The London Wallers

After the death of his grandfather, James Waller,(N) Frederick Waller (P) decided to
leave St Albans for London. The move was certainly made easier by the proximity of
London and, in particular, Stepney, by way of the Lea Cut. Traffic on the canal provided
ready access to the metropolis.

The idea so frequently found among the general public that the East End of
London was a teeming slum and a sink of iniquity is erroneous. In the early nineteenth
century Stepney must have been quite a pleasant place. Even now one can still see, behind
the facade of rather tawdry twentieth century shop frontages, the visible remains of
pleasing, if modest, Regency terraces. The later Victorian houses that escaped the Blitz
are by no means the miserable dens so beloved of Dickensian journalism.

Twenty-one year old Frederick Waller (P) married Sarah Ann Stevens, the daughter
of a hatter, at St Thomas' church, Stepney.1 His father, Charles,(O) had been engaged in
this trade in St. Albans, so some sort of business relationship may have existed between
the two families. Frederick (P) gives his occupation as a porter on his marriage certificate,

but two years later, when his first son, Charles Nathan Waller (Q) was born,2 he is
described as a carpet planner. Frederick,(P) having been at school from upwards of six
years old 3 would have been literate and numerate. (This was not common in the industry
of London before the Education Act of 1891). Later, he is described as a manager.4
However, there is little more we know of Frederick,(P) except that he died before his son,
Charles Nathan (Q) was married in 1886.

Charles Nathan Waller,(Q) born at 8 Bermuda Street, Mile End, was married on 26
December 1886 to Elizabeth George Esther Brown. This marriage took place in Bow
Common,5 an area that had only just ceased to be fairly rural, from information of the
time. Charles Nathan (Q) was always called Nathan by his family. To those of us who are
intrigued by the tides in the affairs of man, it seems amazing that this young man should
have started his working life as a Waterman and Lighterman, navigating the same waters
as the Normans who built the Tower of London, thus taking family history the full circle.
A thousand years earlier his remote ancestor started his career on the rowing bench of a
Long Ship under the aegis of Rollo the Dane.

I have no doubt that Charles Nathan (Q) was a man very akin to his ancestor,
Rollo's grandson; a good physical specimen and resolute of character, factors that
probably enabled both men to marry rather above their station. Charles Nathan Waller (Q)
became a member of the Livery Company of Watermen and Lightermen on 10 December
1889. Prior to this, he had been apprenticed to a member of that Company, a Mr. Mee for
five years.6

Charles Nathan's (Q) wife, Elizabeth nee Brown, was a schoolmistress, obviously
intelligent, with a father in a small way of business. Granny Brown, as she was always
called by the family, read voraciously and before she died had virtually read her way
through Poplar Public Library, much to the amazement of the librarian. From the early
childhood memories of his grandson Joseph,(R) Nathan (Q) was said to have eventually
captained a sizeable vessel and his house contained fascinating curios and many books,
maps and charts, a "huge" trunk and so-forth.

1 19 March, 1865
2 Nathan was a common abreviation of Jonathan
3 see 1851 Census
4 in his son Charles' marriage cert. of 1886
5 St. Paul Bow church
6 registered Apprenticeship No. 6289/1895.

The Chequered Wallers page 32

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The couple's eldest son was born on 3 October 1887 at No. 148 Charles Street,
Mile End. He was christened Charles Frederick James Waller,(Q) thus indicating his
forebears: father, grandfather and great-grandfather, back to Hertfordshire. There were
two other children of this marriage, Rosa Ann who married twice, firstly to Henry Saylor
and then to Henry Palmer, from which marriage there was an only daughter, Gwendoline.
The other child was a son, Edward Waller, who joined the Royal Navy during World War
I, which he survived. His descendants are, it is believed, in Australia.

Charles Frederick James (Q) predeceased his father. It must have been a dreadful
shock to his family when he died following the result of a traffic accident in 1924. He
had been married in Poplar to Annie Elizabeth Ryder, the daughter of Joseph Ryder, (a
coppersmith and tankmaker of Grundy Street) on 2 September 1911 and there were four
children. They were; Nellie Annie, the eldest daughter born in 1912, who died in
childhood in Poplar; Charles Joseph, the eldest son, born in Bromley (Poplar) on 10 July
1915; Joseph John,(R) the second son, born in Edmonton on 4 September 1917; and the
youngest son, Ronald Henry, born at Edmonton on 20 March 1922. Their father died of
septicemia following a compound fracture of the leg in the traffic accident mentioned
above. A few months later, Nellie Annie died in the same hospital, also from septicemia.

The death of the young girl was an additional heartbreak to Annie, so shortly
before widowed. The two avoidable deaths caused a great deal of understandable
bitterness, despite the moral support of her own Ryder family, and says little for the
standards of hygiene at the time; by today's standards, they must have been primitive in
the extreme.

Her father-in-law Charles Nathan (Q) did not long survive his son and this left
Annie in an unenviable situation. She had received compensation from the tramway
company involved in her husband's accident and this was intended to help with the
education of the children. However, Annie was advised misguidedly to sink her small
capital into a shop that also functioned as a cafe. However, this was the era of the Great
Depression and no time for an inexperienced business woman to undertake such an
enterprise in such an area. Predictably, it failed, but fortunately Annie remarried in 1926
to a local man, Stafford Ralph Pawley. There were two children of this second marriage,
Ralph Stafford Pawley and Betty Ann Pawley.

Eventually, the Waller and the Pawley families migrated to Rhodesia (now
Zimbabwe) where both Charles and Joseph (R) applied their technical training, working in
the engineering and mining industries. Ronald Waller ran his own metal recycling
business for several years, and later, a real estate agency in Bulawayo (close to where, he
is now retired), Rhodesia.

Ralph Pawley married Edna Baker. They had three children, Michael, Deborah
and Stephen, all born in Rhodesia. Ralph, who died of a heart attack in his early forties,
was a pharmaceutical executive. His widow, Edna Pawley, remarried to Michael Foster-
Turner, a marketing company director who adopted all the children, they changing their
name to that of their stepfather's. The whole family returned to England and now live in
Reading and Henley-on-Thames. Michael, (married with children) is a quantity surveyor,
Stephen works for a real estate agent and Deborah lives with her parents. Betty married
Leslie Minter, they also having two children in Rhodesia, Victor and Daniel who are both
married, with children, now in South Africa and England respectively.

To return to the Wallers: Charles Joseph Waller married in 1967 to Irene
McCloy, whose family came originally from Belfast, Northern Ireland. They have no
children and live in Johannesburg, South Africa. Charles, now retired, keeps active
restoring antique furniture and growing bonsai trees, among his other interests. Ronald
Henry Waller married Edith Humphries of Henley-on-Thames, at Reading, before leaving
England. They have two children, Amanda Anne, who married Thomas Murray, an
accountant, of Johannesburg. There are two surviving children of this marriage, Jennifer
born in 1970, and Michael, born in 1975; unfortunately, Thomas Murray died young.

The Chequered Wallers page 33

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The only son of Ronald and Edith Waller is Geoffrey Waller, who lives in South Africa.
He married in 1974, and has two sons, Heath and Jason. Geof is a laboratory technician.
His wife, Elaine, is of Scots descent.

Joseph (R) was the first member of the family to migrate to Southern Africa. He
was married before leaving England to Antonia Constance Mary Lopez Mason. Antonia
Constance Mary's father, Mariano Lopez Ramirez was an engineer, originally of Malaga,
Spain, the son of a regular Army Officer. The maternal side of Antonia Constance Mary
Waller's ancestry is of interest to the Waller family. As one may see from her maiden
name, (the Iberians are considerate to genealogists as each child takes the paternal
grandfather's name first and then the maternal grandfather's name) her mother was a
Mason. This family was one among the many claimants of the so-called "Mason
Millions". This was an "in-Chancery Claim" that was eventually disallowed, in the
nineteen-thirties. George Mason, the great-grandfather of Antonia Constance Mary
Waller, was married at St. George's Hanover Square, to Mary Ann Johnson, whose father
was said to be a cordwainer.1 Mary Ann Mason nee Johnson married her youngest
daughter, Florence, to John Marshall of Hertfordshire. Her granddaughter, Gladys, the
daughter of her second son, James Mason, married Harold Phillips. From the Phillips'
marriage there were only two daughters and the Marshall marriage was also left without
heirs. Both John Marshall's sons, John and Roland, predeceased their father. It so
happens that there was no progeny that produced a viable line from any of the Masons,
except, on the distaff side, Antonia Constance Mary Waller.

Joseph (R) and Antonia's elder son, Cristopher Charles Waller,(S) was born at
Caversham, near Reading on 24 December 1944. The Joseph Wallers left England for
Africa in 1947, living for some time in Cape Town, South Africa, later migrating to
Rhodesia. It was in Cape Town that their second son, Francis John Waller was born on
19 November 1950. Joseph (R) worked in engineering, building construction and in
mining in South Africa, the Rhodesias and Botswana, twice setting up his own businesses,
one of which is still operating as a structural steel fabrication company. He retired in
1983 to Essex, England, where he died suddenly of a heart attack on 26 September 1989,
aged 72.

Cris (S) graduated in mechanical engineering from the University of Natal, South
Africa, and completed a post-graduate trainee-ship with Rolls Royce Ltd., Derby, England.
After returning to Africa in 1968 he married Vanda June Peters, a school teacher and
daughter of a farmer of Tzaneen, Transvaal, South Africa. Vanda's father, Vernon James
St. George Peters, is the son of an Australian who emigrated to South Africa after the
Boer war and married a descendant of one of the 1820 Settlers. Vernon Peters married
Dirkie (Lontie) Elizabeth Coetzee, Vanda's mother, in 1944.

After their marriage in 1972, Cris and Vanda Waller returned to Rhodesia. Cris
worked as an engineer at Shabanie and Mashaba Mines. They had two children; John
Vernon, born at Shabani on 1 October 1973 and Katherine Anne, born at Mashaba on 22
February 1975. They migrated to Australia with their two children in 1979. After
working in the Queensland mining industry for some years, Cris moved to Brisbane,
where he is now managing director of a mining machinery manufacturing company.

Joseph (R) and Antonia's second son, Francis was educated in Rhodesia and at the
Malaga Technical College, Spain (1967/69). Apprenticed as a motor mechanic (and
shortly thereafter conscripted into military training in the South African Defence Force for
12 months, fortunately not fighting!), he qualified in March 1973. After working a short
time for a vintage motorcar restorer, he joined a well known English electronics company
in 1975 as clerk of tenders. He married Louise Neumann of Pretoria on 30 Oct. 1975.
One son, Stephen Charles Waller, was born on 29 June 1978. Shortly after, they
separated and a divorce resulted in 1981. Francis worked in engineering administration
(diamond mining) in Botswana and in materials management in New Zealand. He later

1.see the Johnsons of Herts and London

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.
read for a degree in education and is a design technology and business studies teacher in
England. Stephen lives with his mother in Pretoria

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Index of Wills

Anthony Waller of Kneesworth 1556/7 2
Richard Waller otherwise called Warren 1557 5
of Basingbourn
John Waller of Ashwell 1566/7
William Waller of Bassingbourn 1572
John Waller als Warren of Bassingbourn 1575
Richard Waller of Bassingbourn 1580
William Waller als Warren of Ashwell 1599
William Waller of Ashwell Probate 1610
John Warren als Waller of Ashwell 1624
Edward Waller of Ashwell 1700
Andrew Waller of Ashwell 1713
John Waller of Ashwell 1716
Edward Waller of Ashwell 1718

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THE WILL OF ANTHONY WALLER OF KNEESWORTH

MADE 6 DECEMBER 1556/7. PROBATE 22 JAN. 1556/7

In the name of God this sixth day of December in the year of our Lord one thousand five
hundred and fiftieth and in the third and fourth years of the reign of our sovereign Lord
and Lady Philip & Mary by the grace of god, King and Queen of England, both equally
France & Ireland, Defenders of the faith etc., etc. I Anthony Waller of Kneesworth in the
County of Canterbury, yeoman, being of whole and perfect myemory, only thanks being
unto almighty God, do herewith ordaine and make this my last will and testamany in
manner and form following: First, I bequeath my soul to almighty God my creator,
redeemer and my saviour, also to the mission of the most holy and glorious Lady Saint
Mary, mother of my Lord redeemer and king immaculate, And also to the holy company
of heaven by whose wishes etc., etc. Also I bequeath my body to be buried in the
churchyard of Bassingbourn amongst my friends.

Also I bequeath and give to Margery Waller my wife a hundred pounds of good lawfull
money of England. (Four quarters malte?) the best cows and other cows I bought of our
Baronett, halfe the hens and half the ducks, two hoggs, equally to be chosen, a dozen of
(lambs?) a dozen (sheep?) equally to be chosen in like manner as the aforesaid. Three
candlesticks out of half a dozen, I give a pair of chests, one with (catches?) so they should
(rest?) She to have the first choice of them all. I give to the said Margery my wife the best
bed that She can choose and all that appertains thereof, two of the best hutches and all the
whole (h)apiery before (whatsoever?) they be situated before granted, our chasing dish,
the best brass pot of all, the (lead?) as yet standing readyhanged, the best cettle of all and
the third, the best chair of all and all the couches. I give to the said Margery half the
brewing (brasses?) equally to be divided out and I give and bequeath to Jeramy Waller my
youngest son, William Waller, Johan Waller, Thomas Waller and Elyn Waller all the
remainder of my said goods not bequeathed part and portion by originally amongst theym
all indifferently to be divided so fairly the youngermost equates, by the judgement of my
father William Waller, William Good, William Burmand and William Waller my brother
untill such time they shall come and approach the age of twentie years. And my very
mind and will is that Margery my wife shall have the custody and keeping of Jeramy
Waller and his stake and his part shall be kept and also maintained out of my goods by
the space of twentie years and no more And if it happened that the said Margery my wife
to marry I will that she putteth in such care to the childÕs ease untill such time that he
commeth to the age of twentie years. And the lands to be made to my farther William
Waller and all the other my friends as is above specified jointly and severally. And also I
will that Johan my daughter shall have her stake. And also Elyn when they shall come to
the age of (twentie?) years without any further delays And if it happen that any of my
said children to decease before they come of age, I will that the youngest of them and of
any of them equally part and portion like to be divided amongst them fair by my father
and other my friends above specified to be divided amongst the other children
immediately after the deceased so departed out of this world. And if it happen that
Margery my wife to be with child in the making henceforth, I will that the said child shall
have a good portion of the childrenÕs share at the age above divided and their mother to
nurse it and bring it up until such time it be (two?) years old and want any proffit or gains
to pertain for the same. And after that time I will that the same child with the stake shall
be divided to when so ever my father and other my friends before named shall think good.
I will that William my father shall have William Waller my son and his stake untill his
coming of age. I will that William Burman(d?) sall have custody of Johan Waller my
daughter and her stake until she cometh of age. I will that William Good the elder shall
have Thomas Waller and his stake and the custody of him until he cometh of age as above
specified. I will that William Waller my brother shall have Elyn and her stake as is
specified above. I give and bequeath to William Waller my eldist son my coppyholds in
Bassingbourn which I purchased of Robert Pynk withall and sundry equipmenting

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thereunto belonging and in any way appertaining to him and his heirs forward when he
shall come to the age of twentie years. And the produce therefrom during his minority I
will the said William Waller my brother shall have in the mean time to care for the said
son so guarding (abridged here) & dividing the rent thereof until twentie years. And if it
happen that William my son should decease before the above age I will that Thomas
Waller my son shall have the same coppyholds to him and his heirs forward in like
manner and form as William his brother had. And William Waller his uncle to umpire
the same. And for decease of essence of his body to the right heirs of my other son
Anthony Waller and their heirs for ever. The residue of my goods not bequeathed, my
debts and my funeral done I will them to be divided indifferently amongst all my said
children. And all my said children I do ordain and every one of them to be my exsecutors
I give to Thomas Sharman my servant 13(shillings?) and a ewe immediatly to be
discharged after my death. In witness whereof to this present testament I have put my
hand the day and the year specified above in the presents of Thomas Cewster gent. Wm.
Barman, William Good, William Waller the younger, Edward Clarke, with others more. I
will to John Waller Xl(?). I will to Margery Waller Xl(?), I will to Margery Switt
XXÕ(?), I will to all my God children XIII(?) apiece , all my servants within my house
XIII(?) apiece. I will to William Good the elder XI(?), I will to William Burman XII(?), I
will to William Waller my brother XI(?), And all these sums last specified are to be paid
within one year next of my decease.

MADE PROBATE 22ND JANUARY 1556/7.

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THE WILL OF RICHARD WALLER OTHERWISE CALLED

WARREN OF BASSINGBOURN.

MADE 28 MARCH 1557. PROBATE MAY 1557

In the name of God amen. The 28th day of March in the year of Our Lord God 1557, I
Richard Warren otherwise called Waller of Bassingbourn in the Diocese of Ely being
sick in body and in fit mind and rememberance do make my last will and testament in
manner and form following. First I bequeath my soul unto God the Father Almighty God
and maker unto Jesus Christ who hath made me and redeemed me and my body to be
buried at the discretion of my executor.

Item. I do give and bequeath unto Richard my son the house which I now dwell in with
all the land and (pastures?) belonging thereto and also estates monies and assignes with
the appertainces and ll half yeard of land and those messuages belonging to them and one
of therein sometimes called (croft?) of Randall lying at (Gammys?) and also the croft
called Frenche Bridge croft & also half acre of arable land belonging to that and also
Rowses made with all the appertainances and llll acres of broadlands & ll beasts and a
horse for them which I had of him also llll (pounds?) of lawfull monies for the quarter
month which I borrowed of him and also my lease of Busye yearde. Item. I do give the
said Richard my son both the cupboards in the hall and both my tables in the hall
aforementioned ll chayrs & ll buffet scales & my mases Item. I do give & bequeath
unto Nicolas my son my mesuage lying at Gosse Style with the (croft?) of land belonging
to yt (it) & a half yeard lands and mesuage to it belonging sometimes called William
Pynk & another half yardsland with a mesuage called Willimote butting uppon Watson
(grome?). Item. I do give unto Henry my sonne my house at (Fenn End?) holden of the
most with the part lying by it next to the ground of Henry Cram which is held by copy of
Court Roulles of our Sovreygn Lord and lying @ Queens. Item. I do give and bequeath
unto Alice my daughter (100 pounds?) of lawfull mony of England to be delivered within
one year most after my decease . Also a garnishe of partes of the price of 53 (pounds?)
4/- also in which part face (coyre?) the letters calved & a feather bed a matrass a bolster a
(coverlett?) a (dozen of sheets?) & ll pillowcases with the bed. Item. I do give and
bequeath unto my wife Alice my house called (Albynsone?) which castell now dwelleth in
are (12?) acres lands are the (appertaining?) of the said castell during the time of her life
anything before to the contrary not withstanding. Item. I do give and bequeath unto
Henry my son (10 pounds?) of lawfull money of England. Also unto Margerye Warren
the daughter of the said Henry 33 (pounds?) 4/- all the said monies to be delivered within
one year of my decease. Item. I will that after all my debts be paid and my legars fulfilled
& delivered as before as I have bequeathed them I do give whole unto Alice my wife ,
Richard my son & Nicolas my son all my goods and monable and unmonable equally &
indifferently to be divided amongst them through whom I do make ordain & constitute
my executor to pay my debts & fulfill and deliver my legars as before is limitted &
appointed according unto this my last will and testament. Item. I will that William
Warren the son of William Warren the older be supervisor of this my last will to the
future that he shall have the oversight of my executor that they do these deeds in paying
my debts and legars truely as before is prescribed & I do give him for his payment (10
pounds?)

PROBATE (DAY ILLEGIBLE) MAY AD1557

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THE WILL OF JOHN WALLER OF ASHWELL.

MADE 11 NOVEMBER 1566 PROBATE 11 JANUARY 1566/7

In the name of God Amen the XI day of November in the year of our Lord God in the
1566th year, I John Waller of Ashwell in the County of Hertford do make this last
testament being of (w)hole mynde and of good and perfect memory but sick in body do
make and ordain this last will and testament in manner and form following: First I
commit and bequeath my soul to almighty God triumphant to be saved by the grace of his
mercy etc.,etc. and my body to be buried in the churchyard of Ashwell aforesaid.

Item I give unto the poor (church?) people of the parish church XII S. (Shillings?) Item I
bequeath and give to Robert Waller my sonne MI(s?) to be paid unto him at the age ofXXÕ years. Item I bequeath unto William Waller my son MI(?) likewise to be paid when
he is XXÕ years. Item I give unto Elizabeth (Burman?) my daughter XIII (?) to be paid
unto her within the year after my decease. Item I beaqueath unto Jane Waller my
daughter MI (?) to be paid unto her on the day of her marriage. Item I give unto Agnis
my daughter MI (?) to be paid unto her on the day of her marriage. Item I give unto
Margaret my daughter MI (?) to be paid unto her on the day of her marriage. Also as
above for Alice Waller my daughter. If by misfortune any of my youngest children for to
die before they be twentie or before they marry then I will that the others of him or her left
be equally brought the monies amongst the remaining children Item I will that all that my
land in all a XI acres and a half called Sterlyng land which I purchased of a Malcom
Kynad and John Hurst be sold and my hold half which is called Cockralls be also sold
towards the performance of this began. Item I give unto Robert Waller my son XIII (?)
MI (?) to be paid unto him within the year after my decease whom I make supervisor of
this my last will and testament. The rest of my goods & any debts paid and my funeral
expences disposed I do give to Elizabeth my wife whom I make my sole and lawfull
Executrix this being witnessed by William Dorkins - Vicar William Waryn Alice Waller
William Warren junior Richard (Snage?) John Warren and others.

PROBATE MADE 11 JANUARY 1566/7.

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THE WILL OF WILLIAM WALLER OF BASSINGBOURN.

MADE 5 FEB. 1572. PROBATE 23 MAY (AUGUST?) 1573.

In the name of God amen, I William Waller lying at the mercy of Almighty God, being
sick in body but sound and fit in memory, do make this my last will and testament, the
fifth day of February in the year of our Lord 1572, in manner and form following.
commit and bequeath my soul unto the Lord God Father Son and Holy Ghost Almighty
by which I believe and hope to be saved and my body I bequeath unto the earth from
whch it came.

Item, I give and bequeath to Margarett my wyfe, Alice and Elizabeth my daughters (my
debts and legal expences paid), all my goods and chattles to be indifferently divided
between them agreed. Item. I give unto my sister Meargerye half my acre of broke lands
and half my acre of (tilthe?). Item. I give to my sister Beatrix a forty foote and a roode
and a half. Item. I give to my sister Agnes a (weaned calf?) Item. I give to my brother
Henry one acre of wheat. Item. I have authorised Wm. Bolnest to make sale of all those
coppy hold lands, messuages and tenaments which I hold of the Queens Manor and of the
Manor of (Capalle?) and of the Manor of (Gorners?) (Beteweene?) also and the next croft
holding of eithers of the manor / furthermore my will is that if my brother Nicholas be
mynded to buy them all these to have the (forty shilling debt and choice?) them any after
may. Item. I will that my brother Richards friends shall have the bringing up and keeping
of my daughter Elizabeth with her portion and the said friends to be putt in sufficient
bonds for the delivery of the said to my brother Richard Waller when she reach
accomplishing the age of 21 years. Item. I will that my father Thomas Payntor shall have
the bringing up and the keeping of my daughter Alice with her portion and he to be putt in
sufficient bonds to my brother Richard Waller for the delivery of the said stake when she
shall accomplish the age of 21years. Provided if either of my daughters die before they
shall come to the age of 21 years, that then the other do (benefit?). Item. I do devise and
make Margarett my wife the sole executrix of this my last will and testament. Item. I will
that my brother Richard Waller be supervisor of this my last will and testament and for
his paynes I give him X/-. The following witnesseth, George Bowmont Vicar, William
Boulnest, Richard Waller, William Wight, Thomas Payntor and Robert Wilson.

PROBATE 23/8 or 5?/1573.

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THE WILL OF JOHN WALLER ALS WARREN

OF BASSINGBOURN

MADE 10 APRIL 1575 PROBATE (30?).JANUARY 1576

In the name of God Amen. I John Waller als Warren of Bassingbourn In the County of
Cambridge husbandman lying at the mercy of Almighty God being sick and weak in body
but fitt and sound in memory do make my last will and testament this Xth day of April
Anno Domni 1575 in manner and form following: Item. I bequeath my soul unto the
Lord Almighty God trusting in Jesus Christ to be saved Secondly my body to be buried
in the (.... ....?) buriall in the ground from whence it came.

Item. I surrender unto the hand of Richard Waller and William Pink formerly of the
Queene, these akres of broke lands and the croft of William Boulnest and to his heirs for
ever. Item. I give and bequeath to my brother Wm. Bolnest and to his heirs for ever by
estmation seventeen akres of land according to the the bargans made between me and
William Pynck. Item. I give and surrender unto the hands of Richard Waller my house
called Copt Hall & the yard only to the post of William Pynk and to his heirs
conditionally to pay his mother Agnes Bywater during her life natural yearly twentye
shillings. Item. I give to Catherine my wife all my leased land all the tyme of my eight
years and all those of my land unbequeathed with the rest of my houses & the grounds
thereto belonging the term of eleven years more which is in all twelve years paying the
rent of the Lord done. Provided that Catherine my wife should die before the Xll years be
expired then directly after her decease, my son Richard to enter of the said house and land
provided that if my son Richard die without the same that they my brother Wm and his
heirs make to follow all such lands with the houses thereto belonging as the said Richard
hadd by the will of his father John Waller, paying to my children three (.....?) pounds
within six years that is to say X by the year after that the said William or his children shall
enjoy it. Item I give to my children every one of them XX(pounds?). All the rest of my
goods and chattles (My debts and my legars paid and performed) I give to Catherine my
wife who I make sole executrix of this my last will and testament. In the presence of
these Richard Waller William Waller William Boulnest Fran Seaman William Pink
and George Bowmont.

PROBATE (30?) JANUARY1576

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THE WILL OF RICHARD WALLER OF BASSINGBOURN

MADE 23 OCTOBER 1580. PROBATE 19 NOVEMBER 1581.

In the name of God Amen the three and twentieth day of October in the year of our Lord
God one thousend five hundred and four score and in the second and twentieth year of
Our Sovereign Lady, Elizabeth, by the grace of God Queen of England France and
Ireland, Defender of the faith etc. I Richard Waller of Bassingbourn in the County of
Cambridge Yeoman, being weak and sick in body notwithstanding of perfect mind and
memory praise and thanks be therefore given to God do make and ordaine this my last
will and testament in manner and form following. Which first and principally I bequeath
my soul into the hands of Jesus Christ God Almighty my master and redeemer by who's
death and reserection I do (therefore?) believe to be saved and to have found remission of
all my sins. Second I bequeath my body unto the earth from whence which unto intern.

Item. I will and bequeath to Bettrice my wife my fourth part of the manor of Rowses in
Bassingbourn and my French Bridge Croft with there half acre of lands thereunto
belonging during her natural life And after her decease to my brother Nicholas Waller and
to his heirs forever. Item. I give to the said Bettrice my wife all such household stuff
which she brought unto me if it be in my house to be found if otherwise they cannot be
found; that then she shall have the choice of the best that I have. Item. Where ever her
household stuff is somewhat falling into decay, my will is that my Executor shall in
consideration of the repairing it again delivered and paid or cause for it to be delivered and
paid unto the said Bettrice my wife her executors and assigns & to anie of them the sum
of five pounds of good and lawfull monies of England in manner and form following;
twentie shillings to be paid and delivered (immediately?) after my decease and so from
year to year other twentie shillings till the rest of the said sum of five pounds be delivered.
Item. I give unto my said wife tenne pounds of good & lawful monies of England to be
delivered unto her in manner and form following: Vis five pounds presentlie after my
decease and five pounds within one quarter of the year then next and immediately
following. Item. My will is that all the said land before bequeathed unto Bettrice my wife
shall be sowen to her(?) at the cost & charge of my executor the allowings unto my
executor half the (seede?) for this next crop. Item. I give unto Bettrice my wife a third
bed the best (choice?) thus with the furniture thereto blonging with a feather bed, a bolster,
a blanket, a (coverlett?) and one pillow. All the lynon and half the hangings in all my
chambers also that of my best (lynon?) at her want choice which my executor shall (for
part?) as he doth his own untill the feast of Phillipper and Jacob commonly called May
Day next in fortnight also sixe hoggs whenceof twoe to be the best at the (rector?) and the
other four to be the best in the yeard beside Also half the part of the pulltets & fowels
also ten of the best ewes in my fold and my geldings which my executor shall keep
sufficient with barly straw until May Day. Item. My will is that my brther Nicholas
Waller my executor shall weeky deliver unto Bettrice my wife halfe a bushell of wheat and
halfe a bushell of malt after my decease until the feast of St Michael the Archangel next
comming and also that after my decease he do lay two loads of wood in her yeard at
Goose Stile where she shall dwell. Item. I bind my brother Nicholas to deliver and
surrender to Bettrice my wife after my decease of his house at the Goose Style the having
it during her life she also keeping it in sufficient reparations with thatch and claye only,
not being charged with payment of rent nor fine and after her decease to return to the
aforesaid Nicholas and his heirs again. Item. I give and beqeath to Alice Waller and
Elizabeth Waller the daughters of William Waller my brother late deceased to be delivered
unto either of them at the age of twenty one years the sum of five pounds of good and
legal monies of England provided that if either of them shall shall depart this life before
they accomplish the years aforesaid thus then the survivor shall enjoy the other portion
before bequeathed. Item. I give to all my brothers and sister's children except the two
children of William Waller's before mentioned to be deliv'd to (cover?) of them at the age
of twenty one years forty shillings and further that so many of them that are of the age of

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twentie one years and about, my will is that every one of them shall have paid and
delivered unto them within three years next after my decease forty shillings. Item. I give
unto each of the three children of John Martin to be delivered to each of them at the age
twenty one years forty shillings. Item. I give to John (Foot?) to be delivered unto him
within three years of my decease eight pounds. Item. My will is that my servants
Michael & Girildnge shall have delivered unto either of them one Quarter's wages each
and besides their (covernennts?) made with me when they have lived out these years.
Item. I give to William Waller & William (K/Hollywell?) and to either of them five
shillings to be delivered within one year of my decease. Item. I give to Dorothyie
Mau(w)lden four shillings. Item. I give to Agnes Wadley three shillings to be delivered
unto them at the feast of St Michael the Archangell next after my decease. Item. I give to
Anthony Jacklyn one ewe. Item. My will is that my executor shall deliv. unto Radulph
Boulnest within three years next after my decease tenne quarters of barlie good and
sufficient. Item. I give to my god daughter Mary Boulnest one ewe. Item. every one of
the rest of my god children to be delivered within one year twentie pence. Item. I give to
George Beaumont minister of Bassingbourn tenn shillings. Item. I give to the
reparations of the church twentie shillings. Item. I give to the poorst of B'bourn to be
distributed among them within one month of my farewell fourtie shillings. Item. I give to
my brother Nicholas all my houses and lands and tenancies with the appertainings thereto
belonging both freehold and copie conditionally that he shall pay unto my brother Henry
Waller twentie shillings quarterly during his life being lawfully demanded and also other
twentie shillings when he cometh ymydeutelie (immediately!) after my decease. I
commend into the hands of William Boulnest and William Goslyn tenants to the Queen
all my copyhold lands holden of the Queen within her mannor of Bassingbourn to the use
of Nicholas Waller my brother and his heirs forever according to my will in the presence
of William Lawrance the elder one of her tenants. From all the rest of my goods and
chattles remaining after my depart paid, my legacies bequeathed and proposed aforesaid
discharged and my farewell expences done, I give and bequeath to my said brother
Nicholas Waller whom I make sole executor of this my last will and testament Also I do
ordain and appoint William Bolnest & John Marten supervisors of this my last will and
testament and for their pains I give to either of them five shillings. Witnesses hereunto
are John Beaumont, Mister William Boulnest, Randolph Boulnest, William Goslyng and
others.

PROBATE 19 NOVEMBER 1581.

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THE WILL OF WILLIAM WARREN ALS WALLER

OF ASHWELL MADE 31 MARCH 1599. PROVED DEC. 1610

In the name of God Amen. I Willm Waller als Warren in the town of Ashwell in the
County of Herts, yeoman this one and thirtieth day of March in the year of our Lord god
one thousand five hundred ninety and nine poor of bodie but of good and perfect memory
god be praised and therefore do avow and ordaine this my last will and testiment in
manner and form following that is to say First I surrender my soul unto the hands of
Almighty God my maker redeemer and saviour hoping and trusting through the merits of
Jesus Christ to be made partaker of Life everlasting. And I surrender my bodie to the
earth where of it was made. And as touching my worldly goods as follows

Item I give unto William my son all that my lease and term of years not (to?) run out
purchased of and in the (parsonage?) or rectory of Ashwell with all the appurtaining crofts
the virtues which I give and bequeath unto my son Edward with all the proffitts thereof for
and during the tenure of mine years next after my decease. I will that my son William his
executors or assigns shall pay yearly out of the said lease upon Easter monday to the
churchwardens of Ashwell for the time being five shillings towards the reparations of the
Church of Ashwell during all the term of the said lease. Item I will that the same William
my sonne his Executors or assigns shall every year during the tenure of the said lease
upon Good friday bestow upon the poor people of Ashwell fortie shillings in such
manner as he shall think meet Item I will that the said William my son and his Executors
and assigns shall pay yearly out of the said lease during the tenure thereof to four after
my decease unto my son Gawin his Executors or Assigns six pounds thirteen shillings
and four pennies the first payment to begin at the feast of the annunciation of our Lady
Saint Mary which shall be in the year of our Lord God one thousand six hundred and
one. Item I will that the said William his Executors and assigns shall pay out of the said
legacy yearly during the said tenure to Andrew my sonne his Executors or Assigns the
like summe of six pounds thirteen shillings and four pennies the furst payment thereof to
beginn as aforesaid and be used and employed untill he shall attain the full age of one and
twentie years to his best benifitt according to the direction of my said sons William and
Edward and then his Executors or Assigns to receive the summe and the proffitts thereof.
Item I will that the said William my sonne his Executors or Assigns shall pay out of the
same lease yearly during the said term to Henry Waller my sonne his Executors or
Assigns the like summe of six pounds thirteen shillings and four pennies the first
payment to begin as aforesaid to his benfitt untill he shall attain the age of one and twentie
and then the sume with the proffits thereto be rendered by himself his Executors or
Assigns Item I give and bequeath unto my son Edward all my household stuff Viz all
those my moveable goods which are or have been used or occupied within my new
mansion house named the Bakehouse thereto belonging and now confined in them and
either of them and also all the crops of corn and grain which is now growing upon the
land which I give unto him Item I give and bequeath unto my sonne John Waller his
Executors or Assigns all that my lease and tenure of years yet to come of and in all those
lands which I hould of Mr. William Muffett (Mussett?) And the one half of all the
cornland grains which is now growing upon the same lands together with the moiety or
half of the corn and grain growing upon my other lands which I have now sowen except
my sonne Edward's lands Item I give and bequeath unto the said John six horses
indifferently to be chosen with their harnes and dung cart one loug cart with a plowe and
all that thereto appertaineth Item I give unto the children of my sonne William six pounds
in money and six ewes viz every one twentie shillings and to use the same to their best
advantage untill they come to sufficient discretion. Item I give unto anyone of my
daughter's children twenty shillings a piece and one ewe their parents to use the same to
their children's best advantage until their said children come to sufficient discretion to use
the same to their own proffitt. Also I will that the payments of all the said children shall
have the consent of my said two sonnes William and Edward in the employings and

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usings of their said childrens portions further if my son Edward happen to have children
at the time of my decease or that his wife be then with child I will and bequeath to his
child or children so borne or concieved twenty shillings apiece and one ewe to be used
and employed as above. All which ewes so to be indifferently chosen out of my fflocks.
Item I give and bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth Harley (Hurley?) one hundred marks
to buy her a house and that to be bestowed with the consent of my said sonnes William
and Edward and £3 or £4's. there of to remain in the hands of my two sons William and
Edward untill they can conveniently find a fitt purchase (......?) and cause it be conveyed to
the use of my said daughter Elizabeth and her children at the discretion of my said two
sonnes Wiliam and Edward the other twentie nobles to be paid unto her within eight
weeks after my decease and she to use the same untill the tyme of the said purchase And
if the said purchase cannot be conveniently had within one year after my decease then my
will is that the said William and Edward shall pass unto his or her assigns six pounds
yearly untill the said purchase shall be made. The first payment of the six pounds to
begin within two years after my decease. Item I will that the twentie pounds shall be
bestowed out of the residue of my goods bequeathed for the (placing?) of my said sonne
Henry with a (maister?) at the discretion of my Executors Item I give and bequeath unto
every one my daughters and also my daughters-in-law twenty shillings apiece and a ewe
And to my sonne William's wife four pounds besides her twentie shillings Item I will that
John Waller my sonne shall hand the sixteen pounds which is owing unto my br. Willm
Pomfritt who (has?) by obligation to pay to Mr Muffett his rent due at Michaelmas next.
Item I give and bequeath unto my son William the lease of the (dowesue?) lands which I
hold of the Lord Bishop of London. Item I will that Willm West, my servant shall have
that wages which he is now paid made upp twentie shillings to be paid at Michaelmas
next. Also where Christopher Sowell has a cow of mine my will is that he shall pay but
twentie shillings for her. And where Robt Wright oweth me twentie shillings he shall
paye but four shillings thereof. Item all the residue of my goods unbequeathed I will shall
be indifferently (apportioned?) and the money that shall be made there of my debts being
paid ffunerall and other charges borne and legacies before paid aforesaid among my three
sonnes Gawin, Andrew and Henry to be equally done to be paid as followeth Viz to
Gawin at the feast of the annuciation of Our Lady which shall be in Anno Domini one
thousand six hundred and one and to Andrew and Henry at their several ages of two and
twenty years And in the meantime the same to be used to their best proffitt and
consideration at the discretion of my Executors of this my last will and testiment whome I
doo nominate ordain and appoint to be my said two Sonnes William and Edward Item
further I do give and bequeath unto the poor people of Bassingborne in the County of
Cambridge yearly twentie shillings during the term of twentie years next after my death to
be distributed (.....?) yearly upon Good Friday at the direction of my sonne William his
Executors or Assigns in such a manner as he or they shall think meets, which twentie
shillings shall be yearly paid by the said William his heirs or Assigns out of my lands in
Bassingborne aforesaid and in witness thereof I have hereunto set my hand and seale the
day and year first above written in the presence of those who are named and are under
written; Andrew Vig John Sell Fulke Marshall John Goodman

PROBIT GRANTED TO EDWARD WARREN ALS WALLER

DECEMBER ANNO DMI 1610

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THE WILL OF WILLIAM WALLER OF ASHWELL

PROBATE 10 NOVEMRER 1610

In the name of God Amen. I William Waller of Ashwell in the County of Herts. being of
whole and perfect memory, the Lord be thanked sick of body do make and constitute this
my last will and testament. First I bequeath my soul to the Almighty and my body to the
earth to be buried.

Item. I give and bequeath to Edward Waller my son and his heirs my cottage in
Bassingbourn called Seamans later Abbotts with the croft also pasture thereunto adjoining
both free and coppyhold now in the tenure and occupation William (G?)Cade a close of
pasture adjoining next to the land of Mr. Lynn on the North and also my tenement called
Gilding in the occupation of Richard Thorlye next the lands of Nicholas Wright on the
North and the land of Thomas Meade on the South, the West head thereof abbutteth
uppon the street and also further acres of are lying in several parts within fields and parish
of B'bourn and aforesaid whether they be free or coppyhold all of which parcells of land
are contained abbutted and borded in a scedule or tezzior hereunto annexed. Item. I give
all the residue of my messuages, tenaments, lands, medows and pastures which I
purchased of William Nightingale and Katherine his wife settling and being within the
towns and fields of B'bourn aforesaid except one croft of pasture in the West end next to
the land of Wm (G?)Coal on the South and the westhead thereof abbutteth uppon the
street to Henry Waller my son and his heirs yielding and paying out of the same to Agnes
my wife during her natural life yearly in full satisfaction of her debts all of my lands,
tenements, hereditments whatsoever the sum of 20 pounds to be paid unto her at the feast
days of the Annunciation of our Lady the Virgen and of St. Michaell the Archangle or
within 20 days after everie of the said feast days by even and equal portions the first
payment thereof to begin at the next of the said feast days after my decease. And yielding
and paying likewise to Nathaniel Waller my son yearly the sum of 10 pounds payable by
even and equal portions as is before at the days and times limited by this my last will and
testament for the payment of the annuities to my wife & yearly paying likewise to John
Waller my son during his natural life the like sum of 10 pounds in the same way as
before described. And I do further will that my said son Henry shall pay unto the vicar of
B'bourne aforesaid the sum of twentie shillings and of the said last (Dec Premissos?) for
and during the space of twentie years next after my decease payable uppon the feast days
of the Nativity of our Lord which sum of twentie shillings I will that the said vicar shall
behest the halfe there of uppon the poorest people of the town and the other half I will that
the said vicar for the time being shall retain to his own with that he be by the ordinary
allowance for a preacher orelse if he not be allowed for a preacher as afore said & then I
will that he (the said vicar) shall bestow the whole of twenty shillings uppon 20 of the
poorest people of B'bourne. And further my will is that if it happen my son Henry to die
before he accomplish the age of one and twenty for that the said items to him devised do
descende or by other means come unto my heirs that then my said heirs shall likewise &
performe and pay the said annuities and monies of them to my said wife and to my sons
John and Nathaniel according to this my will, and shall further and besides the said
annuities pay the sum of two hundred pounds in manner and form following: That is to
say fortie pounds uppon the feast day of St. Michael the Arcangel which shall follow next
after the decease of my said son Henry or within twenty days after the said feast day.
And so uppon every yearly until the entire sum of 200 pounds of current English monies
be paid accordingly which sum I will shall be paid equally & by stable and even portions
to all my sons which shall likewise at such time and times as the said several sums of
forty pounds shall be payable and done according to this my will and testament. Item. I
give to my sone Thomas Waller and to his heirs all my Lands, tenements, meadows and
pastures both free and coppyhold wherein I have any estate of inheritance within the town
fields and parish of Ashwell in the County of Herts. out of which I will that he pay yearly
for the space of twenty years next after my decease uppon the feast day of the Nativity of

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.
our Lord the sum of ten shillings to the vicar and the churchwardens of Ashwell aforesaid
to be given to twenty of the poorest people of the same town. Item. I do give to Elizabeth
Waller my daughter one hundred pounds to be paid within one year of my decease. Item.
I give to Mercye Waller my daughter one hundred pounds to be paid within one year of
my decease. Item. I give halfe of my plate utensils & and other household stuff
whatsoever within my now dwelling house to my said daughters equally to be devided
between them and the other halfe of my plate utensils and other household stuff within
my said dwelling house I give to Agnes my wife. Item. I give to every one of each of my
brothers and sisters's children one cow to be delivered within one month. Item. I give To
Anthony Risbye (.....?) servant to Mr. Nicholas Kempe the sum of five marks to be
bestowe uppon a ring of rememberance. Item. I give to William Waller my father five
marks to bestowe on a mourning cloak. Item. I give to each of my servants now dwelling
with me five shillings eight pence. Item. I give to the vicar of B'bourn and the
churchwardens and the overseers of the poor of the same town the sum of five pounds
which I will shall remain forever as a stock to be employed by the overseers of the poor of
the town the time being for & towards the setting up of works for the poor of that town.
And the same for Ashwell five pounds likewise. Item. I give to the son of John Waller
20 pounds to be paid at 21 years. Likewise for Nathanial. Item. I will that my executors
shall sell my lease of the Rectory or Parsonage & (mylues?) of Ashwell aforesaid &
towards the payment of my debts & the discharging of this my legacies & my finantial
expences. And all my other leases of any manner, tenencies, lands, medows & pastures
whatsoever I give to my son William Waller. And of this my will and testament I do
constitute & ordain my beloved wife Agnes & my son William my executors. And of
this my will I do appoint and request to be my overseer my good friend Folke Marshall
vicar of Ashwell, Thomas Boulnest of Little Hermitage, Andrew Waller my brother, John
Waller my brother, William Gray and John Sell my brothers-in-law to whom I give the
sum of twenty pounds to be equally devided among them my said overseers to be paid by
my executors within one year of my decease. Witnesses Thomas Boulnest, Folke
Marshall and William Gray.

(The extensive annex of all the properties involves numerous small plots, mostly half acre
areas estimatedtotal about 25/30 acres. About 20 people are named and many location
names are given eg., Harpoll ditch South, Whaddon Bushe, Swin Well, Heathshott, Dead
Woman Way, Lidlington Mare, etc, etc.).

PROBATE 10.NOVEMBER 1610 PUBLISHED 23 DEC.

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THE WILL OF JOHN WARREN ALS WALLER of ASHWELL

MADE 18 MAY 1624 PROBATE 14 JULY 1624

I John Warren als Waller of Ashwell in the County of Hertford, yeoman, this eighteenth
day of May Anno Domi 1624, being sick of bodie but of good and perfect memorie the
Lord be praised therefore do make and ordaine this my last Will and Testament in manner
and forme following Viz Imprimis I commend and comitt my sowle into the hands of
Almighty God trusting after this life ends through the merits of Jesus Christ my only
Saviour and redeemer to reign with him eternally and my bodie to the earth where of it
was made and it in earth placed God to lend me in this world as followeth First I give and
bequeath unto Mr. Thomas Marshall for a sermon at my buryall Six shillings and eight
pence and to the poor people of Ashwell aforesaid the somme of twenty shillings to be
distributed amongst them at my buryall at the discretion of my Executor

Item. I give and bequeath unto John my son and his heirs forever after his age of four
and twenty years one piece of lands contayning by estimation fower (4) acres being now
sowen with rye(?) which of late purchased of Mr. Harwood lyinge near unto Larryes
cross/croft(??) in the fields of Ashwell aforesaid. And lands lying by Kingsdon Way
contayning by estimation fifteen acres more of late purchased of the said Mr. Harwood
five roodes which of late purchased (Edit: Several other lands mentioned). ..... of the
Lords of the Manor of Ashwell. And my Will and meaning is that my son William shall
have and take the assetts there of until my said son John shall attain unto his age of four
and twentie years towards the payment of my debts. Item I give and bequeath unto my
sonne Samuel and his heirs forever to hold from the feast of St Michael the Archangell
which shall next after he has accomplished his age of four and twentie years Twentie four
acres one roode and a half of land lying and being in the fields of Ashwell aforesaid (Edit:
several other lands, about 20 acres mentioned). Item I give and bequeath unto Thomas my
sonne and to his heirs forever from his age of one and twentie years fifteen acres and one
rood of land lying and being also in the fields of Ashwell aforesaid being freehold with
three acres and three rood going through two furlongs more (Edit: Several lands, approx
8 acres mentioned). Item I give and bequeath unto my son Edward and to his heirs
forever from and after his age of one and twentie years fifteen acres three roods and a half
of lands lying in the fields of Ashwell aforesaid Viz half an acre in Redlands between the
lands of John Warren on the one side and the lands (Edit: .....lands of John Barber on
the other side half an acre ..... of the newe gravell pitte between the lands of John Barber
on the one side and the lands of William Plomer on the other side abutt .....Note
interesting neighbours: Edward Waller, William Sell, Thomas Chapman (Pembrooke
Hall), Robert Goode ). Item. I give and bequeath unto my sonne Jonathan and his heirs
forward from and after his age of one and twentie years fourteen acres and a half and a
half a rood of land also in the fields of Ashwell aforesaid with one rood near Royston
(Edit. Several other lands). Item. I give and bequeath unto my sonne Andrew and to his
heirs forward from his age of 21 years 11 acres and three roods lying in the fields of
Ashwell (Edit. Several other lands). Item. I give and bequeath unto my daughter Susan
and her heirs forward from and after her age of one and twentie years all my lands lying
and being in the North field of Ashwell aforesaid containing by estimation eight acres and
all that croft with that appertaining lying between Halbrock land and Great Pinsom. Item.
I will and dowse unto my sonne William and his assigns all the land above mentioned to
be bequeathed unto my said sonne John until such time as the said John shall attain to his
age of twentie four years forward the payment of my debt and also all the said land given
and bequeathed unto my said sonne Samuel until such time as he attain the age of 24
years. My sonne William shall have and take the proffit and benefit of all the lands before
given to the rest of my younger children until they attian respectively 21 years. Item. I
give and bequeath unto William my sonne all my brewing equipment with my malt quorn,
my bedstead in my parlour(?) and all the furniture & bedding therein also. Item. all the
rest of my household stuff unbequeathed I give and bequeath unto all my other children to

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.
be equally devided. I appoint my sonne William to be my sole executor of this my last
will and testement. Further I give and bequeath to my said sonne Andrew and his heirs
one rood and a half of land lying near to St. John Knackle(?). (Edit. Position specified in
detail with another rood and a half given). In witness whereof I have set my hand and

seal, the date and the year
these who's names are underwritten.
Edward Waller, Clement(?) Everett,
Wallinger
first above written
Signed
in
Wthe
John
illiam
presence of
Waller.
Sell and John
PROBATE 14 JULY 1624.

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THE WILL OF EDWARD WALLER OF ASHWELL.

MADE 30 APRIL 1700. BURIED ASHWELL 7 MAY 1700.

PROBATE 3 APRIL 1718.

In the name of God Amen, I Edward Waller of Ashwell Senr. in the County of Hertford,
Yeoman being aged and infirm of body but of perfect and sound memory Praised be
Almighty God for the same Doo make this my last Will and testament in the manner and
forms following (that is to say) first I doo give and bequeath my soul into the hands of the
Almighty God who gave it me and my body to the Earth to be devoutly buryed according
to the discretion of my Executor hereafter named and as for those worldly goods the lord
in mercy hath indowed me withall I dispose of as followeth:

First I give and bequeath unto Susan my dearly beloved wife the sum of one hundred
pounds of lawfull money of England to remain in my Executors hands he paying my wife
five pounds a year during her naturall life for the sume and after her decease the said
hundred pound to goo to my Executor and his heirs for ever allsoo I doo give to my said
wife the use of soo much of my pewter and brass beds and beding and lynnon and all
other of my household stuffe as she shall desire during her naturall life and after her
decease all the said goods I give to my son John. Item. I doo give and bequeath to my
son Jonathan Waller all the money he now owes me for malt and otherwise (except twenty
pound I lent him upon his note to be paid me upon demand and the sume of forty pounds
more of lawfull money of England to be respectively paid him ten pounds a year the first
payment to begin twelve months after the decease of my sister Hannah Waller of Ashwell
aforesaid widow and soo onwards untill the said forty pounds is paid only with this
proviso and for the prevention of any suites or differences that may hereafter arise
between my said son Jonathan Waller and my Executor John Waller my desire is that my
son Jonathan Waller shall within one month after my decease signe and seale and deliver
unto my said son John Waller my Executor as aforesaid a General Release which shall be
fairly drawn and so good in law to barr the said Jonathan his Executors Administrators or
assignes from all and all manner of Clayms Debts Dues and Demands whatsoever he the
said Jonathan Waller may might or ought to have against my said son John Waller for or
by reason of any matter range or thing from the beginning of the world untill the day of
the sole heirs of those my legacys given him in this my Will in the said Release only
excepted And if my son Jonathan Waller shall refuse to give my son John Waller such a
release then my legacy to my son Jonathan Waller shall be in all but five shillings to be
respectively payde him within two months after my decease. Item. I give and bequeath
unto my son Thomas Waller of London the sume of five shillings of lawfull money of
England to be paid within one month after my decease I do give and bequeath to my son
Edward Waller the sume of forty pounds to be respectively paid him at four payments that
is to say ten pounds (per annum?) for four years the first payment to begin twelve months
after the decease of my sister Hannah before named. Item. I doo give and bequeath unto
my brother Jonathan Waller the sume of ten pounds to be respectively paid him three
months after my decease. Item. I do give and bequeath to all my servants the sume of
five shillings (apiece?) and to my old servant William Clerke all my working day wearing
cloaths and to my old servant Oliver Swayne as much cloth of four shillings the yard or
thereabouts as will make him a coat doublet and breechs. I doo give unto my daughter in
law Hannah the wife of my son Jonathan the sume of five pounds and to my daughter in
law Sarah the wife of my son Thomas Waller the sume of five pounds to be respectively
paid them within six months after my decease. Item. I doo give to the poor of Ashwell as
much bread as shall cost forty shillings William Morton of Biglesworth to make it and
distribute it according as he shall have direction from my three loving friends my brother
Jonathan Waller William Chapman And John Griffin and my will and desire is that if any
contraversies or differences shall arise between my Executor and any my other children or
Legatees that they may be determined by my three neighbours and friends Thomas

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.
Chapman the elder William Chapman and John Griffin and that whenever it shall please
God to take away any one of the three that it is my desire alsoo that the two survivors shall
nominate and choose a third person for the ending all such contraversies as aforesaid.
Item. I give unto my son Jonathan Waller more the sume of twenty pounds to be paid six
months after my decease. Item. I give to my son Edward Waller more the sume of fifty-
five pound to be left in my Excecutors hands to pay towards a debt and from my son
Edward Waller to the children of my son Andrew late deceased. Item. I doo give and
bequeath unto all my grandchildren the sume of twelve pound apiece to be paid six
months after my decease and now I doo hereby ordaine constitute and nominate and
appoint John Waller my son Sole Executor of this my last will and testament to whom I
give and bequeath all the remainder of my goods and chattells not before bequeathed and
to whom I leave to descend and come all my lands and tenaments to him and his heires
and asignes forever immediately after my decease and this I doo publish and declare to be
my last will and testament being contained in one sheet of paper making void all former
wills by me made in witness whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and seale the thirtieth
day of April in the fourteenth year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord William the third
now King of England or Anno Domini 1700 Edward Waller his mark. This was signed
and sealed published and declared by the within named Edward Waller to be his last will
and testament in the presents of us who he desired subscribe our names as witnesses

John Lilly Andrew Blewett William Phillips.

PROBATE 3 APRIL 1718

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THE WILL OF ANDREW WALLER OF ASHWELL.

MADE 18 FEBRUARY 1713.

In the name of God Amen the eighteenth day of February in the twelth year of the reign of
our Sovereign Lady Anne by the grace of God of Great Britain and Ireland Queen
defender of the faith and in the year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and thirteen
I Andrew Waller of Ashwell in the county of Hertford yeoman being sick in body but of
sound and perfect mind and memory and understanding do make and ordain this my last
will and testament as followeth. First I resign my soule into the hands of Almighty God
my creator hoping through the merits of Jesus Christ my savour to have full pardon and
forgiveness of all my sins And my body I submitt to the earth to be decently buryed by
my Executors hereafter named. And my worldly goods and estate I dispose of as
followeth.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my cousin Sarah Langthorne and my sister Susan Waller
their heirs forever All that cottage(?) or tenements in Ashwell aforesaid now in the
occupation of George Laby And all other my freehold and copyhold lands tenements &
hereditments whatsoever in the parish of Ashwell aforesaid & elsewhere. Item. I give to
my brother Edward Waller his now wife and to Mary his daughter one guinea a year. I
give to my brother John Waller five guineas if he returns from service either sick or lame
but if otherwise only one guinea. Item. I give to my brother Thomas Waller and his now
wife one guinea a year. Item. I give to my sister Mary Waller five guineas and my will
and meaning is that all the aforesaid legacies shall be paid by my Executors hereafter
named in the three months after my decease. Item. I give to the poor of the parish of
Ashwell aforesaid fifty shillings to be given in bread all the rest of my personall estate
whatsoever I give unto the said Sarah Langthorne and Susan Waller whom I make and
ordaine Sole Executors of this my last will and testament. In witness thereof I have to this
my last will and testement contained in this one sheet of paper setting hand and seal the
day and year first above written. Signed; Andrew Waller Witnesses:
Signed; Jonathan Waller, John Langthorne & John Hart.

PROBATE Not shown.

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THE WILL OF JOHN WALLER OF ASHWELL.

MADE 21 APRIL 1716 PROBATE 3 APRIL 1718.

In the name of God Amen. The one and twentieth day of April in the second year of the
Reign of our Sovereign Lord George by the Grace of God of Great Brittaine France and
Ireland King Defender of the Faith et Anno Do. 1716. I John Waller of Ashwell in the
county of Hertford Yeoman being sick in body but of sound mind and understanding doo
make and ordain this to be my last will and testament in manner and form as followeth
first I commend my soul to Almighty God my Creator hoping through the merits of Jesus
Christ my Savour to have full pardon and forgiveness of all my sins and my body I
committ to the Earth to be devoutly buryed at the discretion of my Executor hereafter
named and as to my worldly goods which it hath pleased God to lend me in this life and
dispose of as followeth.

Imprimis I give and bequeath unto my brother Jonathan Waller the sum of one hundred
and sixty and five pounds which he owes me upon Bond and all the interest and due
thereupon and all other sume and sumes of money due to me from him upon any other
account or accounts whatsoever and also the sume of fifty pounds to be paid unto him
within twelve months after my decease. Item. I give and bequeath unto my sister Hannah
Waller the now wife of the said Jonathan Waller the sume of five pounds to be paid her
within six months after my decease Item I give and bequeath unto Jonathan Waller,
Robert Waller, and Hannah Waller three of the children of the said Jonathan and Hannah
the full sume of twenty pounds to each of them to be paid them within twleve months after
my decease and if any one of them shall happen to depart this life his her or their legacy
or legacys shall become due or payable that then such legacy or legacys or him or her soo
dying to be equally divided between the survivors of them within twelve months after my
decease and if any two of them shall happen to depart this life before their or other of their
said legacy or legacys shall become due or payable then such legacy or legacys as them
soo dying to be paid to the survivor of them within twelve months after my decease. Item.
I give and bequeath unto Jonathan Waller Susannah Waller Edward Cumberland Waller
Dorothy Waller and William Waller the children of my brother Edward Waller the sume
of twenty pounds to each and every one of them severally to be paid them within twelve
months after my decease and if any one of them shall happen to depart this life before his
her their legacy or legacys shall become due or payable then such legacy or legacys of
him or her so dying to be equally divided between the survivors of them and to be paid to
them within twelve months after my decease and if any two or more of them shall happen
to depart this life before their or nay of their legacy or legacys shall become due or
payable then shall such legacy or lagacys of them so dying to be paid to the survivor or
survivors of them within twelve months after my decease. Item. I give and bequeath unto
Edward Waller Thomas Waller Mary Waller and Susanna Waller the children of my
brother Andrew Waller apiece the sum of one hundred pounds to each of them to be paid
to them within twelve months after my decease and if any one of them shall happen to
depart this life before his her or their legacy or legacys of him or her soo dying to be
equally divided between the survivors of them and to be paid to them within twelve months
after my decease and if any two or more of them shall happen to depart this life before
their or any of their said legacy or legacys shall be due or payable then such legacy or
legacys of them soo dying to be paid to the survivor or survivors of them within twelve
months after my decease. Item. I give devise and bequeath unto the aforesaid Edward
Cumberland Waller and to his heires for ever all that parcell of land lately purchased by
my uncle Jonathan Waller of William Warren a part thereof (viz) five acres and a rood
being copyhold of the Mannor of Ashwell. Item. I give devise and bequeath unto John
Waller one of the sons of the said Jonathan Waller and to the heires of his body lawfully
to be begotten and for want of such issue to the said John Waller one of the sons of the
said Andrew Waller and his heires for ever all that my messuage or tenament now in the
occupation of Thomas Chapman and one close of pasture thereunto belonging containing

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by estimation one acre (be it more or less) and also all and singular my freehold and
copyhold lands whatsoever lying and being in the fields and parish of Ashwell aforesaid
the copyhold land containing by estimation eight acres and a half late purchased of
Andrew Blewitt and also all my lands and tenaments whatever in Ashwell aforesaid and
also in the fields and parish of Guilden Morden in the County of Cambridge which I hold
of the Masters, Fellows and Scholars of Pembrok Hall in the University of Cambridge by
lease together with the said lease upon condition that they their heires executors and
assignes shall peaceably and quietly permitt and suffer a way to and from a house called
the Meeting House standing upon part of the premisses for all persons whatsoever and
also all that piece of ground next adjoining unto my estate being on the East side thereof
which I late purchased of Mary Baldwyn of Ashwell with the houses outhouses dove
house also a barn on the backside with an orchard and close containing by estimation one
acre and a half (more or less) with all other the appurtenances of whatsoever [excepting a
stable which opens into the backside which I give devise and bequeath for the use and
purpose of putting up such horses of our friends (commonly called Quakers) as shall
repair to the meeting at any time hereafter for ever]. Item. I give and bequeath unto John
Waller one of the sons of the said Andrew Waller deceased the sume of one hundred
pounds to be paid to him within twelve months after my decease. Item. I give and
bequeath the full sume of five pounds a year to be paid yearly for ever out of a certain
parcell of my freehold estate given unto my nephew John Waller the son of Jonathan
Waller lying in the fields and parish of Ashwell as followeth (viz) two closes next the road
in the middle field contayning by estimation sixteen acres (more or less) alsoo two acres
without side the hedge of the same close abutting on foxlye hills allsoo a close of seven
acres at Blackwell comonly called the Catt Close alsoo a close next Ravens Way
containing about five roods which said five pounds to be paid yearly shall be used and
imployedd for the entertainment of our friends commonly called Quakers who come to
declare the word of God amongst the people at Ashwell and if it be not wholly expended
on that account then the remainder to be distributed amongst the poor people of the same
societie called Quakers yearly and every year for ever. But incase the said John Waller
his heires or assignes shall at any tyme or tymes hereafter refuse or make default of
payment of the said sume of five pounds or any part thereof yearly and every year that
then it shall and may be lawfull to and for John Larkin and Thomas Chapman both
whoolers of Ashwell and their assignes whom I doo nominate and appoint in this my last
Will and Testament to take and receive the said moneys yearly and every year next after
my decease of John Waller his heires and assignes for ever after such default be made to
seize and enter upon all and every part of the said lands and closes and Cott and dispose
of them as they or their assignes shall think fitt without the lett or molestation of any
person or persons whatsoever and whereas I have given five pounds yearly to be paid out
of my estate by my nephew John Waller his heires and assignes for ever in lieu thereof I
give and bequeath unto the said John Waller my nephew fifty pounds to be paid within
twelve months after my decease by my Executor hereafter named. Item. My will and
desire is that Thomas Chapman my tenant paying the rent and performing the covenants
in his lease shall hold the same till the expiration thereof without being disturbed by any
of my nephews or any person or persons whatsoever. Item. I will that what money my
brother Jonathan Waller owes of Right to John Larkin be remitted by the said John
Larkin and the sume so remitted I doo remitt John Larkin of whatsoever he owes me by
Bond or otherwise. Item. I give unto my cousin Richard Worboys Wife twenty shillings.
Item. I give to Richard Fortunos Daughter he had by Ann Salt twenty shillings. Item. I
give to Katherine Everard Widow forty shillings. Item. I give to my Tenant Thomas
Chapman his two children twenty shillings apiece I give to my cousin Edward Waller's
Wife of Hitchin five pounds. Item. I give to the poor of Ashwell five pounds. Item. I
give to all my servants that lived with me that year I left farming five shillings to each
person. Item. I give to the widow Crane and widow Izard ten shillings each. Item. I give
to Jonathan Waller's wife the son of Edward Waller the sume of fifty shillings. Item. I
will that in case my cousin Jonathan Blewitt should come to be poor and in want that then
my nephew John Waller the son of Jonathan Waller his heires and assignes shall pay
yearly and every year out of my estate to him the said Jonathan Blewitt forty shillings
during his life. Item. I give unto William Everard forty shillings. Item. I give unto my
cousin Andrew Blewitt's two children ten shillings each. Item. I give unto my nephew

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Jonathan Waller's child twenty shillings. Item. I give and bequeath unto my dear and
loving friend Thomas Tompson of Hitchin or his heires or assignes the full sume of ten
pounds to be payd within twelve months after my decease Item I give and bequeath unto
my dear friend John Fallowfield of Hertford his heires and assignes the full sume of ten
pounds to be paid as aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto Martha Fallowfield or if
she be deceased unto her children to be equally divided among them ten pounds to be paid
as aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto James Ball of Ashwell and his heires the
sume of forty shillings to be payed as aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto John
Larkin of Ashwell and his heires the sume of forty shillings to be paid as aforesaid. Item.
I give and bequeath unto Elizabeth Smith of Ashwell the sume of forty shillings to be paid
as aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto Katherine Everard and her heires the sume
of forty shillings to be paid as aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto Margarett Mash
Wife of John Mash the sume of forty shillings to be paid as aforesaid provided she
survives her husband. Item. I give and bequeath unto my dear friend Richard Taylor of
Huntington the full sume of ten pounds to be paid as aforesaid. Item. I give and
bequeath unto my dear friend Abraham Gaymor of Holsted in the county of Essex the full
sume of five pounds to be paid as aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto George
(Deplode?) of Romford in the county of Essex but late of Baldock the sume of five
pounds to be paid as aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto John Bodily of Hitchen
and to his heires the sum of five pounds to be paid as aforesaid. Item. I give and
bequeath unto Anthony Bonnett of Ashwell weaver the sume of forty shillings to be paid
as aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto John (Carstairs ?) of Hertford shoemaker
and his heires the sum of five pounds to be paid as aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath
Ralph Thorn of Hertford the sume of five pounds to be paid as aforesaid. Item. I give
and bequeath unto Mary Farmer wife of John Farmer of Saffron Walden in Essex the
sume of five pounds to be paid as aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto Daniell
Saunders of Hitchin shoemaker and to his heires the sume of five pounds to be paid as
aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto Mary Howard of the County of Norfolk the
sume of five pounds to be paid as aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto Thomas
Fallowfield of Wootton in the County of Hertford the sume of five pounds to be paid as
aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto Margarett Paine of Dunstable in the County of
Bedford the sume of five pounds to be paid as aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto
Thomas Symonds of Sharrington in the County of Buckingham the sum of five pounds
to be paid as aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto Thomas White in the County of
Norfolk the sume of five pounds to be paid as aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto
Joseph Croake of Essex the sume of five pounds to be paid as aforesaid. Item. I give and
bequeath unto my dear friend Robert Atkinson of the County of Cumberland belonging to
the meeting of the people called Quakers in the town of Wigmore in the County aforesaid
the sume of ten pounds to be paid as aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto my friend
Josiah Langdale of Bridlington in the County of York and his heires the sume of five
pounds to be paid as aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto my friend Benjamin
Holine of Yorkshire the sume of five pounds to be paid as aforesaid. Item. I give and
bequeath unto Robert Imray of Barton Butchers the sume of five pounds to be paid as
aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto Edward Master of Henloe a blind man the (...
... ...?) Mannor and Farm called Nokes lying and being in the County of Suffolk with all
and singular lands tenaments hereditments and appurtenances whatsoever thereunto
belonging now in the tenure or occupation of Thomas Haywind and (scool?) their or one
of their under tenants or assignes to hold the same to her the said Sarah King for and
during the term of her natural life without impeachment of waste charged and chargable
here after mentioned holdings with the several annuitys or yearly payments owing
aftermentioned and descending and devise the same to such child or children of her body
begotten or to be begotten as shall be living at the tyme of her decease their heires to be
equally divided between them share and share alike but in case any of them shall dye
before they shall attain to their age of one and twenty years or be married then the part or
share of such child or children soo happening to dye shall descend and goo to the
survivors or survivor of them and for default of such issue of the body of my said
daughter Sarah King I give and divise the sume of my own right heires for ever. Item. I
give and devise unto my loving daughter Elizabeth Powell one annuity or yearly sume of
forty pounds of lawfull money of Great Britain to be assigned and payable out of my said

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Farm or mannor called (Nowes / Rores?) by halfyearly payments that is to say at the feast
of St. Michael the Archangell and the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary by even
and equal portions free and clear of and from all taxes payments charges and deductions
whatsoever to have hold and enjoy the same for and during the term of her naturall life the
first payment to be made on such of the feast days as shall next happen after my decease
and in case of nonpayment thereof it shall be lawfull for the said Elizabeth Powell or her
assignes enter into and upon the said premisses charged with the payment thereof as
aforesaid or any part thereof and there to make (disfrayses?) from tyme to tyme untill she
shall be fully payd and satisfied the same together with the charges of such disfreyses.
Item. I give and devise unto my granddaughter Anna Hammond one annuity or yearly
sume of thirty pounds of lawfull money of Great Britain to be issuing and payable out of
my said farms and mannor called (Rowes / Hores?) by half yearly payments that is to say
at the said feast of St. Michael the Archangell and the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin
Mary by even and equal portions and free and clear of and from all taxes payments
charges and deductions whatsoever to have and to hold and enjoy the same for and during
the term of her naturall life the first payment thereof to be made unto her on such of the
said feast days as shall next happen after my decease and in case of nonpayment thereof it
shall be lawfull for the said Anna Hammond and her assignes to enter into and upon the
said premisses hereby charged with the payment thereof and there to make disfreyses
from tyme to tyme for the said annuity which shall be in arrears and unpaid untill she the
said Anna Hammond or her assignes shall be fully satisfied paid the same together with
the charges of such disfreyses soo to be made and my will is that the said annuity or
yearly payment of forty shillings to be payd as aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto
Mary Wells of Weston the wife of Richard Wells the sume of forty shillings to be paid as
aforesaid. Item. I give and bequeath unto John Everard of Chartris the sume of forty
shillings to be paid aforesaid. Item. I doo give and devise and bequeath unto my brother
Edward Waller and his heires forever all those my fifteen acres of copyhold land lying at
Blackwell in the fields and parish of Ashwell aforesaid all which said copyhold lands I
have already surrendered to (they?) of my will alsoo I doo make and ordain constitute and
appoint the said Edward Waller my brother (he paying my debts and discharging my
legacys) sole Executor of this my last will and testament to whom I give and bequeathed
all the rest of my goods and chattells not above bequeathed in witness whereof I have
herunto sett my hand and seale to this my last will and testament containing in six sheets
of paper the day and year first above written JOHN WALLER

Signed sealed published and declared (and those words first interlined) one hundred one
hundred by the said John Waller the day and year above written in the presents of us and
our names hereunto subscribed as witnesses at the request of the testator; Tho: Chapman
John Goxlhold Jasper Brydale

PROBATE 3 APRIL 1718.

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THE WILL OF EDWARD WALLER OF ASHWELL

MADE 29 JUNE 1718 PROBATE 16 OCTOBER 1718

The twentyninth day of June in the year of our Lord 1718 I, Edward Waller of Ashwell in
the County of Hertford being infirm of body but of good and perfect memory Thanks be
to almighty God for the same Do make constitute ordaine and declare this my last will and
testament in manner and form following:

Revoking and annulling by these present all and every testament and testiments will and
wills by me heretofore made and declared either by word or writing and this to be taken
for my last will and testiment and none other and to the intent that all my goods chattells
and crofts, Lands and tenements may hereafter come unto such persons and remain and
be into such uses as by me, the said Edward Waller herein do and shall limit and appoint
in this my last will. So therefore I will order, give and devise as followeth: Imprimis. I
give, devise and bequeath unto my son Edward Cumberland Waller and to his heires and
Assignes forever all that my estate lately purchased of William Plomer of Ashwell both
copyhold and freehold estate with all and every the appurtenances there unto belonging as
is to be seen at large in his conveyance made to me by the said William Plomer. Item.
I give and bequeath unto my son Edward Cumberland Waller and my son-in-law Daniel
Eling their heires and assigns for ever all that my ffifteene acres of Machland copyhold
lyeing in the fields of Ashwell now in the occupation(?) of Thomas Chapman and
bequeathed to me by Andrew Waller my uncle which said ffifteen acres of land I so will
and it is my will that it shall be sold within convient Time after my decease for the paying
off of legacies. Item. I give to my son William Waller and his heires and assigns for ever
All that my messuage or tenement with the Malting Barnes Stable Garden Yard and all
other Appurtenances thereunto belonging now in the occupation of Edward Larkin and
lyeing next the estate of Thomas Chapman West and William Loodley East and abutting
on the ffore street North. Item. I give unto my three granddaughters Lettice Waller, Mary
Waller and Anne Waller the children of my son Jonathan Waller twenty pounds to each
of them to be paid by my Executor hereafter named when they come to the age of twenty
one years. Item. I give and bequeath unto Dorothy Penn the daughter of William and
Dorothy Penn, my granddaughter twenty pounds to be paid to her at the age of one and
twenty years. Item. I give unto my daughter Dorothy Pen one bed and bedding with the
appurtenances also one chair and one coffer all standing in the room over the Butteries
also six pewter dishes six plates two kettles and A round boyler all the rest of my
household goods except(?) those in possession of my son-in-law Daniel Eling I give unto
my two sons Edward Cumberland Waller and William Waller to be equally divided
between them. Item. Whereas the Will of my loving brother John Waller remaineth
unfullfilled by reason I would not comply with the injustice done me by persons bearing
no good will towards me (I being Executor to my brother) who imposcing on my Brother
in the time of his grievous sickness to make another will greatly to the prejudice of me and
my children for their own private ends and also had my Brother lived a small time longer I
believe would have taken away my Executorship which was consulting. Nevertheless to
discharge my conscience after the great fatigues and expenses I have been at in defending
myself against such unrighteous dealings to the great weakening of the assets. I do will
and it is my desire to fullfill the former will made by my loving brother John Waller not
long before his death and which he had by him when he dyed and is now in being having
his perfect senses when he made it as far as the remaining assetts will amount unto and to
that end have appointed Trustees to see the same be fullfilled. Imprimis. I give and
bequeath unto John Waller one of the sons of my brother Andrew Waller fifty pounds
Also I give unto Edward Waller, Thomas Waller, Mary Waller and Susanna Waller ffour
other children of my brother Andrew Waller to each of them twenty pounds to be paid by
my Executor hereafter named. Item . I give to Hannah Waller the wife of my brother
Jonathan deceased fifty pounds and. Item. I give unto John Waller son of my brother
Jonathan Waller fifty pounds and to Jonathan, Robert and Hannah three other children of

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my brother Jonathan Waller twenty pounds to each of them. Item. I give and bequeath
unto the poor amongst the people called Quakers the sum of twenty pounds to be
distributed amongst them according to my Brother's Will made by William Everard to
every one according as their necessity requires the money to be paid by my Son Edward
Cumberland Waller unto William Everard and they both jointly together to see the
performance of the same and lastly all my goods and chattells unbequeathed I give and
bequeath unto my grandson William Penn whom I make Sole Executor of this my last
Will and Testament he paying my debts and discharging in ffunerall expenses and I do
also appoint my son Edward Cumberland Waller and my son-in-law Daniel Eling to be
the overseers of this my last Will and Testament and do give unto my son Daniel Eling all
the household goods of mine in his custody for his trouble excepting the worst Chest of
Drawers which I give unto my daughter Dorothy Penn also all the legacies given to be
paid (unless those where the time is prefixed) shall be paid within twelve months next
after my decease In witness whereof I have to this my last Will and testament contained in
two sheets Sett my hand and seal the day and year first above written Edward Waller
signed sealed published and discharged by the said Edward Waller for and as his last
Will and Testament in the presence of us; William Plomer George Priest the mark of
John Lilly.

PROBATE 16 OCTOBER 1718.

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